Call for Abstracts: Popular Music History special issue on jazz and gender

Kia ora koutou,

With the usual apologies for cross posting. I am pleased to announce a call for abstracts for a special issue of Popular Music History Journal on jazz and gender. Please see below for details:

Special Issue of Popular Music History (2023)

Title: Gender and Jazz: Histories and Scenes

From the latter half of the twentieth century there has been increasing interest and work in gender and jazz, with several collections examining the roles of women and gay and lesbian musicians in the jazz world, both historically and contemporarily. Nichole Rustin-Paschel and Sherrie Tucker’s 2008 collection Big Ears: Listening for Gender in Jazz Studies has now become an eminent text in the area, and more recently, the Jazzinstitut, Darmstadt held its 14th Jazzforum on the topic of gender and identity in jazz (resulting in a published collection by the same name in 2016). These, and other collections and articles, have delved into gender and its roles in the jazz world, however there are still many more aspects to explore.  Gender, and gender binaries, have shaped the jazz world since the 1920s. Now in the 2020s, the centennial of the Jazz Age gives us an opportunity to explore the many ways that perceptions of gender have been defined and evolved over the last 100 years. There is a need to examine where we are at in the 2020s, and to give thought to the work ahead as creative practitioners, researchers and historians. This themed issue seeks to explore both the known and unknown about gender in the jazz world. Asides from issues around femininity and masculinity (and men and women) in jazz, we seek articles that explore musicians, bands, and scenes who have been ignored or shunned because their performance of gender and/or sexual orientation did not comfortably fit into the perceptions held by critics and audiences. We also seek explorations around power dynamics and gender on and off the bandstand, #MeToo, and collectives such as We Have Voice and Keychange.

Please submit a short abstract (no more than 200 words) to guest editor, Aleisha Ward: a.ward@auckland.ac.nz Abstracts deadline: 1 June 2022

cfp (extended): Western Popular Music and the Making of Indian Modernity

Special Issue of South Asian History and Culture: Western Popular Music and the Making of Indian Modernity 

Description of Topic 

From the colonial period onwards a variety of Western musical forms and practices have traveled to the sub-continent interacting with domestic sound cultures and contributing to making of Indian modernity. While other influences from the west – in science and technology, political governance, and market mechanisms – have received considerable academic attention, the impact of western popular music in the Indian context is a relatively ignored area of inquiry. This special issue of South Asian History and Culture is based on the premise that our understanding of Indian modernity is enhanced by a deeper exploration of the ways in which western music – beginning with colonial army bands to MTV and beyond – has contributed to the formation of modern sensibilities in India. The issue focuses exclusively on the western pop music (as opposed to western influences on indigenous music-making) that reached Indian audiences as well as local production of English-language pop and seeks to ask a set of questions surrounding these musical encounters to refine and develop our understanding of how popular cultural flows are constitutive of local modernities. What was/is the nature of the audience for western music in India? Was the reception of this music tied to elite-formation? Can one speak of a sub-culture around western pop? Was there any clearly formed state policy regarding What part did this music play in creating an urban youth culture in postcolonial India? Was the Indian recording industry able to nourish homegrown western pop artists? What the was the role of Indian radio and television in creating an enclave of western pop that was distinct from vernacular popular culture?  

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cfp: Cantautore: the Songwriter in Culture and the Media

Cantautore: the Songwriter in Culture and the Media

Edited by Olivier Julien (Université Paris-Sorbonne), Massimo Locatelli (Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore), Elena Mosconi (Università di Pavia/Cremona)

“Cantautore” is a project that aims to reconsider the role and figure of the singer-songwriter in Italian and international culture.

The singer-songwriter is a mythical figure in popular imagination in different countries, a bridge between a variety and even contradictory forms of experience, both cultural and social. In the Italian context, it has been respectively interpreted in social history as a symptom of collective traumas (Bonanno 2009, Santoro 2010), and in popular music studies as a successful pop icon (Gentile 1979, Borgna 1995-2004), or as a genre (Fabbri, 1982) and – consequently – as an ideological construction (Tomatis, 2019). Only recently, has the transnational dimension of this phenomenon been stressed out and problematized further (Green and Marc 2013, Looseley 2013, Marc 2016).

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C4S – Stories from the Field

Dear Colleagues,

We are looking for submissions for an edited volume addressed to academic and general publics entitled ‘Stories From the Field’ which aims at being a collection of short, autobiographical stories as experienced and written by fieldworkers.

The selected stories should be non-fictional, experienced by fieldworkers while conducting research and/or other workings in their field(s). The definition of ‘field’ and ‘fieldworker’ is deliberately absent to encourage the submission of contributions from various disciplines. 

Stories can be of any nature provided they reflect experiences in the field. Some examples of these could include, but are not limited to:

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cfp: Exploring Audio and Music Tech in Education (Journal of Music, Tech and Ed)

Journal of Music, Technology and Education Special Issue: ‘Exploring Audio and Music Technology in Education: Pedagogical, Research and Sociocultural Perspectives’

Full paper submission deadline: 1 April 2022

The past decade has seen increased interest in the pedagogical facets of audio engineering, sound design, music technology and related fields. Much of this rising interest in the teaching and learning aspects of sound corresponds to a growing number of institutions offering training options for people interested in the technical, creative, scientific and cultural aspects of audio. However, while the options for learning about such topics have expanded, there remains a dearth of scholarship on the theoretical, sociocultural and interdisciplinary aspects of audio and its connection to teaching and learning in a broad array of institutions. Also, little scholarship has emphasized a professional development model for the educational aspects of audio, particularly for those working with the next generation of practitioners in all educational contexts. What impact do audio and music corporations have on facilities and curricular decision-making? For this Special Issue of the Journal of Music, Technology & Education, the guest editors seek contributions addressing one or more of the topics below:
• graduate teaching and research in audio education;
• diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) in audio education;
• improving the quality of teaching and learning in audio education;
• sociocultural, historical and interdisciplinary aspects of audio education;
• limitations of a technocratic model of pedagogy in audio education;
• education-industry partnerships in promoting communities of learning and practice;
• impact of professionalization and standardization of curriculum by corporations;
• audio education as an emerging academic field for research and practice;
• global perspectives on audio education;
• social media, online communities and informal learning;
• pandemic-related case studies including hybrid/online learning strategies; and
• school-based (elementary, secondary, high school) and community-based learning

perspectives/collaborations.

Other topics relating to audio education are also welcome. Please submit full papers
by 1 April 2022 via the journal’s page (which can be found here). Expected publication
date in late 2022 or early 2023. Questions about the CFP are welcome and may be

addressed to Daniel Walzer at dawalzer@iu.edu.

Call for Contributions: RMA Research Chronicle Special Issue – Music and Covid-19

Dear Fellow IASPM Members (with apologies for any cross-posting), 

Please find below details of a wide-ranging Call for Contributions which will hopefully be of interest to some of you.

The Royal Musical Association Research Chronicle is seeking contributions for a special issue on ‘Music and Covid-19’, guest edited by Dr Larry Zazzo (Newcastle University) and Dr Adam Behr (Newcastle University).  As, educators, scholars, performers and audiences, we are all starting to emerge from the pandemic transformed and still facing substantial challenges.  COVID-19 continues to have an effect on the creative economy and its regulatory environment, as well as the practical contexts of making, distributing, teaching and researching musics of all kinds. For many, these challenges have been — and still are— existential, as musicking performers and venues of every genre still struggle to return to a pre-COVID-19 ‘normal’.

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Call for Articles: Journal of Global,Pop Cultures

We are pleased to announce the first “Call for Papers” (https://www.journalofglobalpopcultures.com/submissions) for the 1st edition of our upcoming “Journal of Global Pop Cultures”, an initiative of Shared Campus and of its the theme group “Pop Cultures” in particular (https://shared-campus.com/themes#pop-cultures). 

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REMINDER – Call for Chapters – Progressive Rock, Metal and the Literary Imagination (extended deadline)

Progressive Rock, Metal, and the Literary Imagination

Chris Anderton and Lori Burns, editors

Progressive Rock, Metal, and the Literary Imagination will present analyses of progressive rock and metal music that reveals a striking engagement with literary texts and themes – from classic literature, mythology and poetry to science fiction, horror, and other genres. While many of the extant publications on progressive rock and metal have focused on the history of progressive rock, few have examined the ways that it intersects with the literary imagination, whether drawing on myths, legends, and stories as source material, or using storytelling modes to create new stories and worlds. Progressive rock musicians have often created concept albums based around these source materials and worlds, and they offer more than simply fantasy and escapism, with narratives and themes that comment on the social, cultural, and political milieux in which they are made.

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SEM Journal of Audiovisual Ethnomusicology – Call for Submissions

The Journal of Audiovisual Ethnomusicology (JAVEM) is a newly established, bi-annual, peer-reviewed streaming journal of ethnomusicological film and video sponsored by the Society for Ethnomusicology.

JAVEM aims to advance the use of video/film as a method for exploring music and its entanglements, and as a medium for presenting those explorations.

We invite the submission to JAVEM of original audiovisual contributions.

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cfp: Exploring Audio and Music Technology in Education

Special Issue: ‘Exploring Audio and Music Technology in Education: Pedagogical, Research and Sociocultural Perspectives’

Full paper submission deadline: 1 April 2022

The past decade has seen increased interest in the pedagogical facets of audio engineering, sound design, music technology and related fields. Much of this rising interest in the teaching and learning aspects of sound corresponds to a growing number of institutions offering training options for people interested in the technical, creative, scientific and cultural aspects of audio. However, while the options for learning about such topics have expanded, there remains a dearth of scholarship on the theoretical, sociocultural and interdisciplinary aspects of audio and its connection to teaching and learning in a broad array of institutions. Also, little scholarship has emphasized a professional development model for the educational aspects of audio, particularly for those working with the next generation of practitioners in all educational contexts. What impact do audio and music corporations have on facilities and curricular decision-making? For this Special Issue of the Journal of Music, Technology & Education, the guest editors seek contributions addressing one or more of the topics below:

Continue reading