cfp: The Globalization of Postcolonial Pop Music: Putting the Success of the K-pop Industries into Theoretical Perspectives

Asia Pacific Business Review Special Issue:

The Globalization of Postcolonial Pop Music: Putting the Success of the K-pop Industries into Theoretical Perspectives

Guest Editors:

Professor Jangwoo Lee, School of Business Administration, Kyungpook National University & Success Economy Institute, Korea

Professor Paul Lopes, Dept. of Sociology, Colgate University, USA

Professor Chris Rowley, Kellogg College, Oxford University & Bayes Business School, City, University of London, UK

Professor Ingyu Oh, Faculty of Foreign Studies, Kansai Gaidai University, Japan

Professor Lynn Pyun, Graduate School of International Studies, Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Korea

Over the last two decades. the South Korean music market has grown into the seventh largest in the world, while its boy band BTS was ranked number one in 2021 as the most popular and best-selling global artist by IFPI (International Federation of the Phonographic Industry). All these factsare simply confounding to many pundits of the industry as no postcolonial music market has achieved global breakthroughs as such other than South Korea. Only three countries in Asia are listed on the top 10 global music markets: Japan (2nd), China (6th) and South Korea (7th). Among these, South Korea is the only postcolonial country that became independent from Japan after the Second World War.

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CFP and Job Announcement – JSMG

Development Editor: Journal of Sound and Music in Games

The Journal of Sound and Music in Games (JSMG) was successfully launched in 2020 and has published three rich and varied volumes. It has been approved for indexing by SCOPUS, an endorsement of its quality and vitality. Now, the journal is recruiting an additional editor to increase JSMG’s capacity to further make good on its aim to encompass all aspects of, and approaches to, sound and music in games. Games are understood here in the widest sense, including non-digital games, childhood games and ludic approaches to music and sound.

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Call for Submissions – SEM Student News, 18.1 (“Fieldwork and Identity”)

Dear Colleagues,

This is the first call for submissions for the Fall 2022 issue of SEM Student News. The theme for this new issue, Vol. 18, No.1, is “Fieldwork and Identity.” After over two years of disruptions and reconsiderations of the fieldwork process brought on by the pandemic, many graduate students, who might have experienced delays, are once again preparing to enter the field. Despite the impending sense of a “return to normalcy,” many of us are finding that the pre-pandemic “field” we may have been prepared for has changed in fundamental ways. This issue of SEM Student News is an opportunity for graduate students to participate in a process of dialogue and exchange about their aspirations, experiences, and adjustments they have made in relation to fieldwork. At the core of this discussion, we hope to center the issue of identity: How have the intersections of our own identity, that of our research collaborators, and that of the field itself changed the ways we are thinking about the past, present, and future of our work? Beyond articles that reflect on experiences or offer novel theoretical considerations of the topic, we particularly welcome pieces reflecting collaborative approaches that promote the forum- and community-based goals of this issue.

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Call Extended – SEM Student News, 18.1 (“Music and Pleasure”)

Dear Colleagues,

This is the second call for submissions for the Spring/Summer 2022 issue of SEM Student News. The theme for this new issue, Vol. 18, No.1, is “Music and Pleasure.” The frequent stratification between professional musicianship and making music “for pleasure” often frames the latter category as something less serious or valuable. But for many of us, participating in and experiencing music in informal or communal spaces fills us with powerful sensations of joy. Music is often a part of other activities associated with pleasure such as sex, the alteration of one’s consciousness through drugs or meditation, and physical expressions like dancing. Music is also frequently integral to the pleasure gained from forming connection with a group (e.g., singing songs at sporting events) or passing through different stages of our lives (e.g., music in play settings among children). In this issue, we want to take seriously the interrogation of pleasure as it relates to these and other activities in and around music.

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cfp: Gender in Pub Rock

Andy Bennett and Jon Stratton are editing a collection discussing pub rock in the UK and Australia. We are looking for someone to write a chapter on gender, focusing on women, and pub rock in the UK. The completed chapter will be around 6000 words and we will need it around the middle of November. The book is to be published by Routledge. All enquiries should go to either Andy or Jon, or both of us. Andy’s email address is a.bennett@griffith.edu.au, Jon’s email address is jon.stratton@unisa.edu.au.

cfp: Special Issue of Rock Music Studies

After All This Time: Legacy Acts, Fandom, and Collective Identity

Guest-edited by Andy Bennett and Devpriya Chakravarty (Griffith University, Australia)

Submissions are invited for a special issue of Rock Music Studies on the topic of Legacy Acts, Fandom, and Collective Identity. Popular music is now increasingly acknowledged as a key aspect of contemporary history and heritage. The marketing of popular music as a form of youth-based leisure and consumption from the mid-1950s onward has had significant implications for its cultural meaning as a collective soundtrack and a means through which successive generations of youth have sought to distinguish themselves from the parent culture. This aspect of the relationship between popular music and youth became more pointed during the 1960s and into the 1970s with a new political sensibility among youth, and was also reflected in much of the popular music of the time, which gave rise to a global counter-cultural movement. This sensibility continued to reverberate in subsequent musical genres such as punk, post-punk and new wave.

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Call for Abstracts: Popular Music History special issue on jazz and gender

Kia ora koutou,

With the usual apologies for cross posting. I am pleased to announce a call for abstracts for a special issue of Popular Music History Journal on jazz and gender. Please see below for details:

Special Issue of Popular Music History (2023)

Title: Gender and Jazz: Histories and Scenes

From the latter half of the twentieth century there has been increasing interest and work in gender and jazz, with several collections examining the roles of women and gay and lesbian musicians in the jazz world, both historically and contemporarily. Nichole Rustin-Paschel and Sherrie Tucker’s 2008 collection Big Ears: Listening for Gender in Jazz Studies has now become an eminent text in the area, and more recently, the Jazzinstitut, Darmstadt held its 14th Jazzforum on the topic of gender and identity in jazz (resulting in a published collection by the same name in 2016). These, and other collections and articles, have delved into gender and its roles in the jazz world, however there are still many more aspects to explore.  Gender, and gender binaries, have shaped the jazz world since the 1920s. Now in the 2020s, the centennial of the Jazz Age gives us an opportunity to explore the many ways that perceptions of gender have been defined and evolved over the last 100 years. There is a need to examine where we are at in the 2020s, and to give thought to the work ahead as creative practitioners, researchers and historians. This themed issue seeks to explore both the known and unknown about gender in the jazz world. Asides from issues around femininity and masculinity (and men and women) in jazz, we seek articles that explore musicians, bands, and scenes who have been ignored or shunned because their performance of gender and/or sexual orientation did not comfortably fit into the perceptions held by critics and audiences. We also seek explorations around power dynamics and gender on and off the bandstand, #MeToo, and collectives such as We Have Voice and Keychange.

Please submit a short abstract (no more than 200 words) to guest editor, Aleisha Ward: a.ward@auckland.ac.nz Abstracts deadline: 1 June 2022

cfp (extended): Western Popular Music and the Making of Indian Modernity

Special Issue of South Asian History and Culture: Western Popular Music and the Making of Indian Modernity 

Description of Topic 

From the colonial period onwards a variety of Western musical forms and practices have traveled to the sub-continent interacting with domestic sound cultures and contributing to making of Indian modernity. While other influences from the west – in science and technology, political governance, and market mechanisms – have received considerable academic attention, the impact of western popular music in the Indian context is a relatively ignored area of inquiry. This special issue of South Asian History and Culture is based on the premise that our understanding of Indian modernity is enhanced by a deeper exploration of the ways in which western music – beginning with colonial army bands to MTV and beyond – has contributed to the formation of modern sensibilities in India. The issue focuses exclusively on the western pop music (as opposed to western influences on indigenous music-making) that reached Indian audiences as well as local production of English-language pop and seeks to ask a set of questions surrounding these musical encounters to refine and develop our understanding of how popular cultural flows are constitutive of local modernities. What was/is the nature of the audience for western music in India? Was the reception of this music tied to elite-formation? Can one speak of a sub-culture around western pop? Was there any clearly formed state policy regarding What part did this music play in creating an urban youth culture in postcolonial India? Was the Indian recording industry able to nourish homegrown western pop artists? What the was the role of Indian radio and television in creating an enclave of western pop that was distinct from vernacular popular culture?  

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cfp: Cantautore: the Songwriter in Culture and the Media

Cantautore: the Songwriter in Culture and the Media

Edited by Olivier Julien (Université Paris-Sorbonne), Massimo Locatelli (Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore), Elena Mosconi (Università di Pavia/Cremona)

“Cantautore” is a project that aims to reconsider the role and figure of the singer-songwriter in Italian and international culture.

The singer-songwriter is a mythical figure in popular imagination in different countries, a bridge between a variety and even contradictory forms of experience, both cultural and social. In the Italian context, it has been respectively interpreted in social history as a symptom of collective traumas (Bonanno 2009, Santoro 2010), and in popular music studies as a successful pop icon (Gentile 1979, Borgna 1995-2004), or as a genre (Fabbri, 1982) and – consequently – as an ideological construction (Tomatis, 2019). Only recently, has the transnational dimension of this phenomenon been stressed out and problematized further (Green and Marc 2013, Looseley 2013, Marc 2016).

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C4S – Stories from the Field

Dear Colleagues,

We are looking for submissions for an edited volume addressed to academic and general publics entitled ‘Stories From the Field’ which aims at being a collection of short, autobiographical stories as experienced and written by fieldworkers.

The selected stories should be non-fictional, experienced by fieldworkers while conducting research and/or other workings in their field(s). The definition of ‘field’ and ‘fieldworker’ is deliberately absent to encourage the submission of contributions from various disciplines. 

Stories can be of any nature provided they reflect experiences in the field. Some examples of these could include, but are not limited to:

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