Call for chapters: Intellect Handbook of Global Music Industries

Call for chapter proposals

Intellect Handbook of Global Music Industries

Edited by Chris Anderton, Martin James, Daniel Nordgård and Sergio Pisfil

Social, technological and political developments and disruptions continue to impact the music industries, fostering new revenue streams and opportunities, and allowing music from around the world to gain a global audience. Audio streaming, video apps and social entertainment services have rapidly become key areas of growth, and there has been a rise in academic work focusing on the global music industries in terms of their issues, challenges, and opportunities. Much of this work describes developments in the global north, and while this book will explore and expand upon this field, it also seeks to explore the industries from a global perspective. We therefore encourage proposals that stress global overviews, tackling issues to do with global capitalism, trans-national companies, geo-politics and so on, but also proposals that focus on significant local/regional contexts that cast light on global differences and what may be learned from them.

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call for chapters: Inscribed on Flesh: Culture, Trauma, and the Reemergence of Biopower during Times of Pandemic

With the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic and the crisis following to the increasing number of deaths, forced closures, exclusions and lockdowns, and the social, emotional economic aftermaths; the reemergence of the biopolitical argument is hardly surprising. In his last lecture “Society Must Be Defended,” (1975-1976), French philosopher Michel Foucault refers to biopolitical governmentality, which determines the differential exposure of human beings to health and social risks. According to Faucault’s historicized view of modernity, citizens are not subjects of law, but a biological entity to be controlled by means of epidemiological (biostatistical) surveillance. The emergence of biopolitics paved the way for fragmenting the biological continuum, in order to create hierarchies between different groups and, thus, differences in the way in which the latter were exposed to the risk of death. Racism became the “condition of acceptability” of such a differential exposure of lives in a society in which power is mainly exercised to protect the biological life of the population and enhance its productive capacity.

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cfp: Independence and digital technologies: music making in the 21st century beyond Anglo-America

INET-md | NOVA FCSH

http://www.inetmd.pt/index.php/calls/14764-call-for-proposals-independence-and-digital-technologies-music-making-in-the-21st-century-beyond-anglo-america

The idea of independence in music making has been the subject of academic research and discussion ever since the establishment of popular music studies as well as in intersecting areas of knowledge such as ethnomusicology and the sociology of music.  Most studies on independence in the 20th century address the possibilities for musicians and other agents within the sphere of music making, distribution and mediation to operate and reach an audience outside the oligopoly of the big music corporations. The last twenty years have seen important changes in the power balance between those forms of music making and the big companies due to the effects of digitalization and disintermediation in the music production cycle.  These opened new possibilities for artists and micro-labels to release music by bypassing the distribution chain provided by big companies. However, we also see the rise of new forms of corporate distribution and funding, such as through streaming platforms and brand sponsorship. These changes raise important questions about the shifting notions of independence and what it means in these new contexts. Many of these changes and what they meant have been scrutinized, especially in the contexts of the UK and the US. This book seeks contributions on independent music making outside of the UK and US in relation to the impact of digitalization on music related practices in the 21st century.

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call for chapters: The Chiptune Studies Reader

With apologies for cross-posting.

Dear Colleagues,

We are excited to announce that we are seeking contributions for The Chiptune Studies Reader, an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed and edited volume on chiptune – or ‘chipmusic’ and ‘micromusic’ as it is also known – which we intend to publish through Oxford University Press. Rooted in the emergence of video game audio technology, and subsequently re-routed through the subversive musicality of an underground participatory culture, chiptune is a form of electronic music that has blossomed into a global phenomenon over the course of nearly four decades. Today, the umbrella term ‘chiptune’ subsumes an ever-growing plethora of (sub)genres, practices, and a heterogeneous worldwide following, whose musical output is as creatively playful and diverse as it is distinct by way of its mediation. Chiptune’s technologies, timbral palettes, and associated iconography have grown rapidly in their accessibility, playability, and ubiquity, and have become woven into pop-cultural imaginaries far beyond their own humble beginnings in the music of video games’ past.                           

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Call for Chapter Proposals on DJ Cultures in Canada

Proposed Title: We Can Dance If We Want To: Canadian DJ Culture Turns Up

Edited by Dr. Charity Marsh and Dr. Maren Hancock

“As a creative performance, the DJ set has the potential to communicate new ways of being, of feeling, producing musical discourses that are nevertheless embedded in the real-world, material, politics. In this way, DJ practices enable the immediate reconstitution of local cultural identity.” (Rietveld, 2013, 7)

The rousing success of the Art Gallery of Ontario’s “Nightclubbing” panel discussion focusing on the history of Toronto club culture is one of many recent events that illustrates a growing desire to celebrate Canadian DJ culture. Facebook and other social media sites are rife with archival material relative to DJ culture in Canada from the 1980s until the present. And although the first DJ was technically a Canadian (Reginald Fessenden gave the first radio broadcast of music and speech in 1906), Canada’s unique contributions to DJ culture are mainly absent from academic and public discourse. 

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cfp: Information Overload? Music Studies in the Age of Abundance

Information Overload? Music Studies in the Age of Abundance

8-10 September 2021, University of Birmingham

Keynote Speakers: Robin James (University of North Carolina at Charlotte)

                                Nick Seaver (Tufts University)

                                More speakers TBA

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cfp: Sonic Engagement: The ethics and aesthetics of community engaged audio practice

Please see below for editorial contacts and instructions for initial submissions.

Edited by Sarah Woodland (Faculty of Fine Arts and Music, University of Melbourne, Australia) and Wolfgang Vachon (School of Social and Community Services, Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning, Canada) 

Due for publication in early 2022 

About the book 

This edited collection aims to investigate the use of sound and audio production in community engaged participatory arts practice and research. The popularity of podcast and audio drama, combined with the accessibility and portability of affordable field recording and home studio equipment, makes audio a compelling mode of participatory creative practice. Working in audio enables a flexible approach to participation, where collaborators in sites such as prisons, schools, and community settings, can engage in performance and production in flexible ways, while learning valuable skills and producing satisfying creative outcomes. Audio works also allow projects to reach wider audience (and for longer) than an ephemeral performance event, extending the potential for diverse perspectives to be heard beyond prison walls, across borders, and between different communities and cultures.

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cfp: Rethinking the Music Business: Music Contexts, Rights, Data and COVID-19

Rethinking the Music Business: 

Music Contexts, Rights, Data and COVID-19 

Call for chapters for an edited volume to be submitted to Springer’s Music Business Research Series  


Editors
Guy Morrow (University of Melbourne)
Daniel Nordgård (University of Agder)
Peter Tschmuck (University of Music and Performing Arts, Vienna)  

COVID-19 had, and is having, a global impact on health, communities and the economy. As a result of COVID-19, music festivals, gigs and events were cancelled or postponed across the world. This directly affected the incomes and practices of many artists and the revenue for many entities in the music business. Despite this crisis however, there are pre-existing trends in the music business – the rise of the streaming economy, technological change (virtual and augmented reality, blockchain etc.), new copyright legislation etc. Some of these trends were impacted by the COVID-19 crisis while others were not. 

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cfp: Writing HerStories: Women’s Rock Memoirs

CALL FOR PAPERS FOR AN EDITED COLLECTION:

Writing HerStories: Women’s Rock Memoirs (Provisional title)

Editors: Cristina Garrigós (National University of Distance Education, UNED, Spain) and Marika Ahonen (University of Turku, Finland).

The last ten years have seen a significant rise in the number of published memoirs by female rock musicians. Patti Smith’s Just Kids (2010) came out in the same year that Kristin Hersch’s Rat Girl (2010) appeared, and others soon followed: Alice Bag’s Violence Girl: East L.A. Rage to Hollywood Stage. A Chicana Punk Story (2011), Kim Gordon’s Girl in a Band (2015), Carrie Brownstein’s Hunger Made Me a Modern Girl (2016), Chrissie Hynde’s Reckless (2016), Michelle Cruz Gonzales’s The Spitboy Rule. Tales of a Xicana in a Female Punk Band (2016), Cosey Fanni Tutti’s Art, Sex, Music (2017), and Viv Albertine’s Clothes, Clothes, Clothes. Music, Music, Music. Boys, Boys, Boys (2016). More recently, there are Debbie Harry’s Face It (2019), Liz Phair’s Horror Stories. A Memoir (2019), and Kathy Valentine’s All I Ever Wanted (2020). These examples – all from the U.S. and the U.K. – suggest that there is a growing interest in, and room for, women’s rock memoirs.

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