European Music Analysis and the Politics of Identity

Special issue of Danish Musicology

Online Editors: Thomas Jul Kirkegaard-Larsen and Mikkel Vad

Since the 1980s, questions of identity markers such as gender, race, and class, have become a central focus of research and academic debates in areas such as musicology, ethnomusicology, musical anthropology and sociology, popular music studies, and many more. In the wake of Philip Ewell’s article on “Music Theory and the White Racial Frame” (2020), such longstanding conversations have been amplified while gaining new momentum in the areas of music theory and music analysis. The debate surrounding Ewell’s critique of music theory’s white racial frame in general, and Heinrich Schenker’s Anglo-American legacy in particular, have mainly taken place in a US context where “Music Theory” (closely related to the practice of music analysis) functions as a discipline independent from “Musicology” and “Ethnomusicology.” As the debate has gained international attention, however, it remains an open question how, to what extent, and under what circumstances the US debates about music theory are pertinent in Europe: on the one hand, music theory and music analysis are practiced in ways that differ significantly from the American scholarly tradition, not just because Heinrich Schenker’s influence has been very limited, but also because theory and analysis are often conceived of as integrated subdisciplines of musicology rather than independ- ent areas of research and education; on the other hand, we contend that questions of whiteness, Eurocentrism, race, gender, sexism, and more, are no less important in a European context, and that time is ripe for a fruitful scholarly discussion of these issues in music analysis, music theory, and related fields of music studies. In this special issue we invite scholars and practitioners of music analysis to reflect upon the role of race, ethnicity, nation, class, gender, and sexuality in a European context. For the purposes of the special issue, we conceive of music analysis, widely, as a scholarly and pedagogical practice engaging with sounding musical material or notated music in the fields of music theory, music history, ethnomusicology, dance studies, and sound studies, as well as related interdisciplinary fields.  
We invite manuscript submissions on topics including, but not limited to, the following: –  Whiteness–  Racism, sexism, classism–  Ethnicity and nationality–  Decolonization and antiracism–  Diversity, equity, and inclusion in music analysis–  Music theory and analysis in education–  Non-Western music theory and music analysis–  Case studies of previously marginalized individuals/peoples/repertoires/theorists–  Comparative studies of different analytical traditions–  Historical perspectives on music theory/music analysis/musicology–  Methodology and analytical techniques; hermeneutics and critique–  Vernacular music theory and public musicology–  Challenges to analytical universalism and objectivity
Submission may be in one of two formats: a) peer-reviewed article; b) colloquy contribution (1000–4000 words, subject to editorial review). Upon submission, please indicate clearly which category your manuscript falls in. Submit manuscripts by June 1 2021 to
Thomas Jul Kirkegaard-Larsen tki@natmus.dk or Mikkel Vad vadxx03@umn.edu. Manuscripts should follow the guidelines set by DMO: http://danishmusicologyonline.dk/vejledning.html danishmusicologyonline.dk

Punk Passages: Punk, Ageing and Time – Call for Chapter Proposals

Writers are invited to submit chapter proposals for an edited collection of work exploring ageing, time and temporality in the context of punk.

Initial academic consideration of punk posited it as a youth culture and the positioning of punk in relation to time and historical location is of course commonplace in scholarship. This can be seen outside of academia too, for example the ‘celebration’ of the 40th anniversary of punk and the associated events which took place highlight the way punk is often link with a particular time in our collective memory. Just as punk scholarship has endeavoured to deal with the notion of punk retaining significance in individuals’ lives ‘post-youth’, empirical work has built around how punk is remembered and represented. And yet…tensions, issues and gaps remain unaddressed.

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IASPM International Research Seminar

The next International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) International Research Seminar is being hosted by IASPM Australia New Zealand. You can get full information and a digital ticket here:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/iaspm-january-research-seminar-tickets-132280335043

It is on Friday 15th January 2021 at 10am AEDT in Australia

In the UK that is Thursday 14th January 2021 11pm GMT

In Europe that is 12 midnight early in the morning on Friday 14th July

In the USA that is 6pm on Thursday 14th January

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cfp: Ecologies of Sound

The Music and Sound Studies Network of the German Studies Association (GSA) invites proposals from scholars for panels at the 45th Annual Conference in Indianapolis, IN, from September 30 – October 3, 2021. We welcome proposals that consider how ecologies of sound have manifested themselves in German-speaking communities or German spaces throughout the world, and the ways in which these relations, patterns or systems have evolved and developed over time. The network supports scholarship from a wide range of interdisciplinary approaches and welcomes projects that focus on noise and sound as much as on music. The network also encourages either completed research or more speculative, tentative and preliminary hypotheses. In addition, the network hopes to build on last year’s format by having slightly shorter papers to ensure more time for discussion. Some potential considerations to guide proposal submissions may be:

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2021 IASPM-Canada Book Prize/ Prix du livre IASPM-Canada

Call for Nominations/ Appel à nomination
2021 IASPM-Canada Book Prize/ Prix du livre IASPM-Canada
Deadline/Date limite: 1 April 2021

English version follows below.

Appel à nomination pour le Prix du livre IASPM-Canada (2021)
La branche canadienne de l’Association internationale des études en musique populaire (IASPM-Canada) lance son appel à nominations pour le Prix de la meilleure monographie publiée par un membre faisant une contribution importante à l’étude de la musique populaire. Pour être éligible, celle-ci doit avoir été écrite par une auteure canadienne, un auteur canadien, publiée par une maison d’édition canadienne ou doit traiter d’une thématique pertinente au contexte canadien. Les recueils d’articles ne sont pas éligibles. Les ouvrages en nomination pour le Prix de la meilleur monographie IASPM-Canada doivent avoir été publiés en 2019 ou 2020.

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cfp: Special issue of The Radio Journal: ‘Competing Sounds? Podcasting and Popular Music’

Special issue of The Radio Journal: ‘Competing Sounds? Podcasting and Popular Music’

Guest editors: Ellis Jones (University of Oslo) and Jeremy Morris (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Abstracts due: 20th January 2021

On 19 May 2020, Spotify announced they had secured worldwide rights to distribute The Joe Rogan Show – arguably the world’s most commercially successful podcast – exclusively through their streaming platform. This move, reportedly worth over $100m, follows a series of notable licensing deals and acquisitions by Spotify (e.g. Gimlet Media, Anchor, The Obamas, etc.). But the heavy investment in this emerging media format also puts podcasts and music in economic and cultural tension. Noting the paltry royalties Spotify distributes to musicians, jazz historian Ted Gioja scoffed that the Rogan deal shows ‘Spotify values Rogan more than any musician in the history of the world.’

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cfp: Big Sounds from Small Places (IASPM Canada 2021)

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Big Sounds from Small Places

IASPM Canada Annual Conference 2021 Call For Papers

Virtual Conference

7 – 18 June 2021

Submission Deadline: 15 January 2021

As we enter into a new decade it’s apt to question our place in the world. Almost sixty years ago, Marshall McLuhan notably coined the term Global Village to refer to the global spread of media content and consumption, and yet Canada still struggles with its position in the world as an imposing landmass with a relatively small population, and how that influences where and how its cultural texts are encountered. This conference seeks to address the concept of voice and sound as tied to space and place, in the broadest sense. In regards to popular music in Canada, we have established a strong identity, but one that is often defined in opposition to our more vocal neighbours to the South. As we continuously define and redefine Canadian cultural identity, and cultural outputs, this conference questions how our musical landscape has historically adapted, and will continue to adapt, to an increasingly globalized environment.

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