cfp: IASPM Journal – Dance & Protest Special Issue

Special Issue CFP: Dance and Protest

Editors: Serouj Aprahamian, Shamell Bell, Rachael Gunn, and MiRi Park

IASPM Journal is the peer-reviewed open-access e-journal of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM). As part of an international network, the journal aims to publish research and analysis in the field of popular music studies at both global and local levels.

The recent succession of protests and uprisings following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of (now former) Minneapolis police officers overwhelmingly included dance as a protest tactic. While dancers have long engaged in cultural acts of resistance, this iteration in the #blacklivesmatter movement stemmed directly from the efforts of dancers/activists who participated in the protests following the deaths of Trayvon Martin, Ezell Ford, and Michael Brown. Dancer/activist/scholar/mother Shamell Bell deemed “Street Dance Activism” as a protest tool to celebrate Black Joy in the face of Black death, and renowned dance scholar Brenda Dixon-Gottschild has noted how such actions have gained increasing visibility over the last decade.

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Volume!’s latest issue on hip hop : Le monde ou rien?

VOLUME ! La revue des musiques populaires, n° 17-2

LE MONDE OU RIEN? LÉGITIMITÉ ET AUTHENTICITÉ DANS LES MUSIQUES HIP-HOP

Décembre 2020 • 280 pages • Format : 21 x 21 cm • ISBN : 978-2-913169-63-0 • ISSN : 2117-4148 • français • 19 euros  

Dossier dirigé par Séverin GUILLARD (Université Paris Est Créteil, Lab’Urba) et Marie SONNETTE (Université d’Angers)   

Ce numéro a reçu le soutien du laboratoire CRESSPA (CNRS/Paris Lumière)

La revue Volume! est soutenue par l’IRMECCEN (Paris 3 Sorbonne-Nouvelle)

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cfp: Sounds of the Pandemic

Sounds of the Pandemic
International online conference, December 16-17, 2020

3 Keynotes | 8 Thematic Sessions | 10 Virtual Posters | 60 Panelists: the conference programme is now online! GO TO PROGRAMME.

The conference will take place on Zoom as a Video Webinar. There will be room for up to 500 registered attendees: registration opens on Tuesday, December 1 on the conference website  and will close on Monday, December 14. 

The event will not be live streamed on social media, but will be later uploaded on YouTube.

Info: soundsofpandemic@gmail.com 


Website: www.soundsofthepandemic.wordpress.com 


FB page: https://www.facebook.com/comesuonalatoscana 


FB event: https://www.facebook.com/events/205823927623577 

WATCH TEASER

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cfp: Sonic Engagement: The ethics and aesthetics of community engaged audio practice

Please see below for editorial contacts and instructions for initial submissions.

Edited by Sarah Woodland (Faculty of Fine Arts and Music, University of Melbourne, Australia) and Wolfgang Vachon (School of Social and Community Services, Humber Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning, Canada) 

Due for publication in early 2022 

About the book 

This edited collection aims to investigate the use of sound and audio production in community engaged participatory arts practice and research. The popularity of podcast and audio drama, combined with the accessibility and portability of affordable field recording and home studio equipment, makes audio a compelling mode of participatory creative practice. Working in audio enables a flexible approach to participation, where collaborators in sites such as prisons, schools, and community settings, can engage in performance and production in flexible ways, while learning valuable skills and producing satisfying creative outcomes. Audio works also allow projects to reach wider audience (and for longer) than an ephemeral performance event, extending the potential for diverse perspectives to be heard beyond prison walls, across borders, and between different communities and cultures.

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cfp: “New Approaches to Music and Sound,” Journal of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era (special issue)

New Approaches to Music and Sound
Guest Editors: David Suisman and Rebecca Tinio McKenna

If new book series and journal special issues are any indication, over the last decade, there has been a surge of interest in the musical and sonic worlds of the past. Scholars of music, sound studies, disability studies, transnational and postcolonial studies, cultural history, history of the senses, and others have been expanding our historical understanding of soundscapes, music cultures, aurality, acoustics, and other aspects of the work sound does in the world. New scholarship is connecting music and sound with politics and social movements, capitalism and commerce, the formation of racial, gender, and class identity and difference, the history of technology and of natural environments, and more.

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cfp: Musical Biopics and Musical Documentaries from the Scandinavian countries

Call for contributions to a Journal of Scandinavian Cinema In Focus section highlighting Musical Biopics and Musical Documentaries from the Scandinavian countries 

This is a call for short subject contributions (2000-3000 words) focusing on how Scandinavian film and television have presented musicians, singers, bands and orchestras in biopics and documentaries. We welcome submissions that – after a quick theoretical introduction and concise contextual background – offer discussions of topics such as: 

  • the film’s role within cultural memory – usually restricted to a single national market and often catering to a certain age group’s intragenerational memories 
  • the handling of generic conventions; from narration and characterization to the selection of music, casting choices and staging of performances  
  • the function of music in specific films and film genres 
  • marketing and authentification discourses, including media coverage of stars and their work with particular roles and performances, as well as screenwriters’ and directors’ use of biographies, interviews, original footage and recordings 
  • national and international reception of such films  
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Narrating Popular Music History of the GDR: A Critical Reflection of Approaches, Sources and Methods

Editors: Beate Peter (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK) and Michael Rauhut (University of Agder, Norway)

Submissions are invited for a special edition of Popular Music History that aims to assess the sources, approaches and methods with which East German popular music is written.

Background

Histories of German popular music generally focus on examples of West German music which were commercially successful and/or are considered to be aesthetically and musically ground-breaking. Bands such as Kraftwerk, Can, Neu! or the Scorpions are the subject of many academic as well as non-academic publications, and they are considered as canonical as genres such as Krautrock or Neue Deutsche Welle. East German musicians or movements, on the other hand, tend to be overlooked, as do specific artistic forms of expression which were developed in response to authoritarian leadership in the socialist German Democratic Republic (GDR). The examination of a relationship between the GDR and the arts is almost altogether absent from a pan-German popular music history.

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