cfp: 1st International Music Livelihoods Symposium

The Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre and/of the Creative Arts Research Institute will be holding the 1st International Music Livelihoods Symposium (online), December 6&7, 2021. https://musiclivelihoods.com/ Keynote speakers include Dr Nicole Canham (Monash University) author of recently-released Preparing Musicians for Precarious Work (Routledge).

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cfp: Popular Music, Populism and Nationalism in Contemporary Europe

Call for Papers: Popular Music, Populism and Nationalism in Contemporary Europe

University of Oldenburg (Germany), 07–09 April 2022

Organisation: Prof. Dr. Mario Dunkel, Reinhard Kopanski, Simon Wehber (University of Oldenburg; Faculty III; Department of Music). 

Deadline for submitting proposals: 15thNovember 2021

It is undisputed that the recent rise of populist-nationalist and far-right parties poses a challenge to democracies, not exclusively, but also in the European Union. However, “populism’s toxic embrace of nationalism,” as Lawrence Rosenthal calls it, is more than a party-political or economic phenomenon. It also has a cultural dimension, which remains largely unexplored. Regarding music as a ubiquitous cultural practice, this conference addresses this cultural dimension from three music-oriented perspectives: 

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cfp: 2022 Pop Conference

2022 Pop Conference Call for Presentations

When I Think of Home: Race and Borders in Popular Music”

April 21-23, 2022

Many of us have been home, listening to music. Stuck there during the global pandemic, we have explored what home sounds like and what home means materially, culturally, and in ways that are utterly personal. As a place of security that feels less a given than before; as a right that many do not enjoy; as a nexus of struggle in a time of gentrification, economic transformation, conflict over indigenous homelands. For some home is a place it can be necessary to leave, and for others it is one, as Stephanie Mills made clear, it sure would be nice to get back to.

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cfp: Innovation in Music 2022

Innovation in Music Conference 2022

Royal College of Music, Stockholm

24 – 26 March 2022

Music Production: International Perspectives

Call For Papers

​Innovation in Music 2022 will be held at the Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden on 24 – 26 March 2022. A Routledge conference proceedings book will be published after the event.

Please note that the conference will be held in Stockholm as planned. However, there may be participants who are prevented from traveling to Stockholm due to the ongoing pandemic. We will therefore offer the opportunity to present papers digitally. Participants who already know that they prefer to participate digitally are kindly asked to indicate this when submitting their abstracts. Please note that Abstract must be submitted no later than 12 September , 2021

The theme remains wide for contributions, but with a titled theme of “Music Production: International Perspectives”

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cfp: IASPM-Canada 2022

Starting Over? Popular Music and Working in Music in a Post-Pandemic World.

University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

May 22-25, 2022

IASPM-Canada and the Working in Music research network (WIM) invite abstracts for their joint 2022 conference, to be held at the University of Western Ontario, in London, Ontario, Canada.

The IASPM/WIM 2022 joint conference welcomes scholarly research from all disciplines that engages with the changing contexts of musical practice experience—music making, the circulation of music, musical pedagogy and fandom, music and social movements, and various other dimensions of musical engagement—playing, dancing, streaming, listening.

For more than a year, the global pandemic has highlighted and accelerated the destabilization of practices and institutions of music making and partaking. The enforced hiatus from many aspects of public life offers a chance to evaluate music practices. Which have continued? Which ones will resume? Which ones may not return, at least not as they were?

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cfp: IASPM-US 2022

IASPM-US 2022 Conference: Grooves and Movements

May 26-May 28, 2022

Ann Arbor/Detroit Michigan

Dates and Place:

The International Association for the Study of Popular Music-United States chapter (IASPM-US) invites proposals for its annual conference, which will take place in Ann Arbor at the University of Michigan on May 26-28, 2022. We welcome abstracts for individual papers, organized panels, roundtable discussions, and alternative (non-paper) presentations on all aspects of popular music, broadly defined, from any discipline or profession. We especially encourage submissions on the many rich popular music histories of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and Detroit.

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IASPM XXI cfp and newsletter

Featured

Greetings!

On behalf of the IASPM XXI 2022 Organizing Committee, we are pleased to invite you to the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) to be held at Daegu, South Korea on 5-9 July 2022. As you all know, IASPM 2021 originally to be held in July 2021 was postponed for 12 months. Due to this postponement, we are reopening Call for Presentations (CFP) for those who missed the chance to apply first time around and those who wish to revise or replace their original proposals.

Having been held every two years since 1981, IASPM is now one of world’s most prestigious international conferences of popular music studies. It will be a fascinating opportunity for participants to share the latest information and knowledge in the diverse areas of popular music.

For the conference, a wide range of current topics in Climates of Popular Music will be discussed in the forms of speeches, panel sessions, and poster sessions. You may refer to our e-Newsletter and Website for more information including keynote speakers, topics, the host city, and conference proceedings.

The IASPM XXI 2022 will be held in a hybrid format combining virtual and face-to-face conference sessions even when there is a dramatic improvement in the situation with regards to international travel. This is a decision based not only on the current pandemic situation but also on our concern about climate change. Details of how the conference is organized is to be announced later.

Please note that all of your proposals and papers must be submitted through our online submission page. Through this platform, we hope we provided an easy and convenient way for applicants to participate.

If your proposal was already accepted by the IASPM last year, you do not have to re-submit it. Your status as being accepted will be maintained. However, you will need to confirm your intent to maintain your presentation via online submission page.

You can also revise or replace your previous abstract accepted if you would like to. However, in this case your new or updated abstract will be considered a new submission and reviewed by the IASPM committee again.

Additionally, panel participants should consult with the panel organizer to make changes to their individual abstract for the panel. It is up to the panel organizers to confirm panel participants’ intention to continue to join the panel and to reorganize the panel if necessary.

Thank you!

IASPM XXI 2022_Key dates

  1. Call for Abstract: September 1~October 31, 2021
  2. Notification of Review Result: January 31, 2022
  3. Early-bird Registration: March 1~April 31, 2022
  4. Standard Registration: May 1~June 30, 2022

For further details, please visit the IASPM XXI 2022 official website.

cfp: ‘Rethinking Participatory Processes Through Music’ Study Days

‘Rethinking Participatory Processes Through Music’

14-15 January 2022, online event

https://musicdemocracystudydays.wordpress.com

Convened by Igor Contreras Zubillaga (British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Huddersfield) and Robert Adlington (University of Huddersfield)

Keynote speakers: Hélène Landemore (Yale University), Anna Bull (University of York), Raymond MacDonald (University of Edinburgh)

In recent times, the UK’s Brexit vote, the 2016 US presidential election, and other elections worldwide have made democratic processes the subject of unprecedented public debate. This has led to widespread questioning of the mechanisms for people’s participation in the democratic system and in political decision-making. One of the most ground-breaking inquiries into what public participation ought to look like within democracy has recently been carried out by political scientist Hélène Landemore (Yale University). In her book Open Democracy (2020), Landemore favours the ideal of ‘representing and being represented in turn’ over direct-democracy approaches. Drawing on recent experiments with citizens’ assemblies, Landemore offers a different concept of nonelectoral democratic representation.

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cfp: Staging popular music

Staging popular music: sustainable music ecologies for artists, industries and cities

Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands, 3-4-5 November 2021

AIMS
This conference focuses on the intersection between key transformations in the popular music industries. Music represents and generates value on various levels from the individual to the global, and in many different spheres from the cultural and social to the economic and political. Popular music is staged through multiple platforms, actors, businesses, intermediaries and policies. The current COVID-19-crisis both challenges the music industries and acts as a catalyst of new digital innovations. This is a vital moment to (re)consider the future directions of the music industries. While the music industries are characterized by continuous change and transformation, significant disruptions have always impacted its resilience. Such disruptions can be external shocks, including the current crisis, new technologies, political change or aesthetic-cultural innovations. From an ecological perspective, all transformations force the industry to reshape and rethink itself. This will likely result in both positive as negative consequences. We need to critically reflect on what the immediate and long-term future of music ecologies entails, who benefits and who suffers from such disruptions.

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