cfp: AHHE – Faculties and futures for the arts and humanities in higher education

Call for Papers
Special Issue in Arts and Humanities in Higher Education
‘In the name of employability: faculties and futures for the arts and humanities in higher

education’

Guest Editors
Dr Daniel Ashton (University of Southampton, UK)
Professor Dawn Bennett (Bond University, Australia)
Dr Zoe Hope Bulaitis (University of Birmingham, UK)
Dr Michael Tomlinson (University of Southampton, UK)

Background

This special issue aims to examine the faculties and futures of the arts and humanities within the context of global labour market and higher education reforms. We ask contributors to
consider the role of the arts and humanities within the context of work and society, both now and in the near future; the visions and versions of employability that are invoked and responded to within the arts and humanities; and the solutions which might enable the arts and humanities to regain or reframe their centrality. Ten years ago, the edited collection The Public Value of the Humanities (Bate, 2011) suggested that ‘recession is a time for asking fundamental questions about value’ and the contributors did just that with their reflections on the public value of arts and humanities disciplines. This 2021 special issue seeks to examine the intricate connections and global challenges of ongoing recession, pandemic, climate change, national populism, intersectional inequalities, and more. A 2021 review in response to this panoply of crises is an opportunity to explore the continued and growing value of arts and humanities in higher education. It is also clear that this timely exposition and exchange is situated in the idea of what the arts and humanities can offer (Reisz, 2020). As governments and higher education  institutions address the ongoing impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic, the value of a university degree continues to be a disputed and debated field. Graduate destinations and employment outcomes have long been factored into the accounts of value and consequences when it comes to the role and function of the arts and humanities higher education (British Academy, 2017; Britton et al., 2020). At the same time, there has been considerable debate and reflection on the economic and social purposes of higher education (McArthur, 2011). Current governmental policy concerning higher education management firmly identifies the question of value with employment. For example, the recent interim response to the UK’s “Post-18 Review of Education and Funding” (Augar, 2020) highlights that skills and jobs are the priority in terms of government engagement in HE reform (DfE, 2021). The emphasis in the UK is on ‘strong graduate employment  outcomes’ (see Adams, 2020) and in Australia, as elsewhere, there is similar identification of the need for ‘job ready graduates’ (Grattan, 2020). The terms of this discussion are reinforced in the responses and reports from a range of scholarly and policy organisations. This special issue explores the position and potential futures for the arts and humanities within this context. Building on the 2017 report The Right Skills, the British Academy’s Qualified for the Future report (2020) sets out how ‘graduates who study arts, humanities and social science disciplines are highly employable across a range of sectors and roles’ with recognised skills of ‘communication, collaboration, research and analysis, independence, creativity and adaptability’. Similarly,  recent data from Forbes (Marr, 2019) and LinkedIn (2019, 2020) demonstrate that industry recognises the benefits of employees with skills learned and developed through critical thinking and creative activity. This also resonates with employers’ discourses around soft skills and other behavioural competencies that add value to workplaces. The ongoing social and economic shifts taking place during the global pandemic will undoubtably influence the skills that are valued in the labour market.

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Call for Chapter Proposals on DJ Cultures in Canada

Proposed Title: We Can Dance If We Want To: Canadian DJ Culture Turns Up

Edited by Dr. Charity Marsh and Dr. Maren Hancock

“As a creative performance, the DJ set has the potential to communicate new ways of being, of feeling, producing musical discourses that are nevertheless embedded in the real-world, material, politics. In this way, DJ practices enable the immediate reconstitution of local cultural identity.” (Rietveld, 2013, 7)

The rousing success of the Art Gallery of Ontario’s “Nightclubbing” panel discussion focusing on the history of Toronto club culture is one of many recent events that illustrates a growing desire to celebrate Canadian DJ culture. Facebook and other social media sites are rife with archival material relative to DJ culture in Canada from the 1980s until the present. And although the first DJ was technically a Canadian (Reginald Fessenden gave the first radio broadcast of music and speech in 1906), Canada’s unique contributions to DJ culture are mainly absent from academic and public discourse. 

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DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Editors: JPMS (Journal of Popular Music Studies)

DEADLINE EXTENDED!

The Journal of Popular Music Studies (JPMS) is accepting applications for two co-editors to begin three-year terms on July 1, 2021. JPMS, published on behalf of the United States branch of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM-US), is a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to research on popular music throughout the world, approached from a variety of positions. Published four times a year, each issue features essays and reviews, as well as roundtables and creative works inspired by popular music. https://online.ucpress.edu/jpms

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Rolling call for blog posts, LGBTQ+ Music Study Group

LGBTQ+ Music Study Group

Are you a student or early career researcher with some ideas about queer musicology you would like to share? Then, we’d love to hear from you!

The LGBTQ+ Music Study Group is currently looking for new submissions for our online blog. Submissions can take the form of an essay or any other sort of creative response such as a video essay, a composition, a poem, or a piece of creative non-fiction. We want to uplift the new and exciting voices in the field of queer and trans music studies, so if you have some thoughts to share, we would love to hear them! We especially welcome submissions from BIPOC scholars and musicians and those that address issues of race, ethnicity, and intersectionality.

Submissions are carefully peer-reviewed by an editing committee. For written submissions, we suggest a 1000 word-count, but the limits are truly endless! If you are interested, please send a 200-word abstract to thomas.r.hilder@ntnu.no and we will get back to you shortly. We look forward to hearing from you!

Check out our blog here.

Nominations for Election to IASPM Executive Committee positions

Featured

Dear IASPM Members,

The International Executive Committee would like to invite IASPM members to apply to stand as a member of the Executive Committee. If you would like to nominate someone to stand for a position, please email Beatriz Goubert Secretary@IASPM.net, who is copied in to this email. (Please do not press reply all, and reply to the whole list 😊).

Please discuss any nomination with the person involved before nominating them, if you are not self-nominating. We have had cases in the past where people have been nominated and are not willing to stand, which is not very helpful!

IASPM Executive Committee positions are all available for vote at the Biennial AGM, so you can be nominated for any position, whether or not the holder of the current position is standing again. IASPM Executive Committee positions include Chair, General Secretary, Membership Secretary, Treasurer, Web/Publications, and Member-at-large.

We are in particular seeking someone to stand as IASPM Treasurer, to handle our finances, as Simone Kruger is stepping down.

If you wish to nominate someone, please email Beatriz, the deadline for submission of nominations is 31 May 2021.

Voting will be take place electronically in advance of and at the start of the AGM, 12 Noon BST, 1 July 2021,  details will be sent out in due course.

Many thanks

Rupert Till

Queer Mutual Mentoring Pilot Scheme of the LGBTQ+ Music Study Group

Call for Participants

The Queer Mutual Mentoring (QMM) pilot scheme is a resource for all students, scholars, and musicians who identity as LGBTQ+ or their allies in addressing challenges of our work and student lives. It allows for participants to engage in mutual sharing, learning, supporting, and inspiring, processes that can flow in different directions depending on the individual participants. One of the central aims of the scheme is to strengthen the exchange of knowledge and skills for dealing with issues that relate to, or are shaped by, issues of gender and sexuality, as they intersect with other aspects of our identities and biographies. Mentoring can include a wide range of points of discussion, including but not limited to the following issues:

  • Coming out to fellow students/colleagues
  • Career guidance both within and beyond the academy and music industry
  • Discrimination and bullying (among student and/or staff)
  • Discussing queer theory
  • Expanding networks
  • Self-care strategies
  • Challenging trans-, bi- and homophobia among peers
  • Negotiating new roles and institutional structures
  • Queering the syllabus and/or teaching methods
  • The needs of a student body that’s diverse across gender and sexuality
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Wanted: IASPM International official social media assistant

EDIT: The position has been filled.

Dear IASPM colleagues,

Social media plays an increasingly important part in our world, whether Facebook, TikTok, Instagram, Twitter, or QQ. IASPM has an informal facebook page, but wishes to have more presence on for example Twitter and YouTube, maybe also on other platforms. We are looking for someone willing as a volunteer or volunteers to work for IASPM periodically distributing social media posts.

The job would involve posting activities by IASPM and its branches on social media platforms, and increasing the associations profile. It would suit a postgraduate student, or early career lecturer or researcher. This would be an excellent for increasing your profile as an academic, and adding some sparkle to a CV. You would be co-opted on the International Executive Committee of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music. You might post material on conferences, our research seminars, and other activities. It may be that two or more people would like to share the workload.

If you are the sort of person who actively and regularly uses Twitter, Insta, Facebook, YouTube etc., then this might well suit you. The position is unpaid, voluntary. 

IASPM Research Seminars in February and March

Dear Colleagues,

There are a few things to announce about the IASPM Monthly Online Research Seminars.

Firstly, in order to allow us to properly record the seminars, and also to allow for live streaming, and co-ordination with ticket booking on Eventbrite, we have purchased an IASPM Zoom account. This “Pro” account, allows for there to be 100 people taking part actively in the seminar (with chat functions etc.), so each research seminar will have 100 tickets, on Eventbrite, which is a ticketing website. If these tickets are sold, we hope to stream the event on YouTube or Facebook, which will mean any number of people can at least watch the seminar. The seminars will be available to anyone, not just to IASPM members, so please advertise them far and wide, including to postgrad and graduate students, and on any email lists you know.  We will also record and publish all seminars.

You can look on the IASPM YouTube channel for the live streams of the research seminars at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCii1IhY4vnGskTwf3GUyhjQ

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Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies (IAPMS) Online Workshop vol.06: Thrusday, February 4th, 8PM (UTC+9)

Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies (IAPMS) Online Workshop vol.06


Date: Thursday, February 4th, 2021 
Time: 8PM (UTC+9) 
8PM (Korea/Japan) 

7PM (Malaysia/China/Hong Kong/ Taiwan /Singapore/Perth)  


Title:  
KL Sing Song: alternative voices in the Kuala Lumpur singer songwriter circuit (2005 – 2009)

Speaker:
Azmyl Yusof (Sunway University Malaysia)
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To register for this Zoom event, please fill out the form with your name, affiliation, and email address. The Zoom link information will be sent to you one day before the event. 

https://forms.gle/SkuXVkvBATcXFR8i7

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