cfp: IASPM Journal – Dance & Protest Special Issue

Special Issue CFP: Dance and Protest

Editors: Serouj Aprahamian, Shamell Bell, Rachael Gunn, and MiRi Park

IASPM Journal is the peer-reviewed open-access e-journal of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM). As part of an international network, the journal aims to publish research and analysis in the field of popular music studies at both global and local levels.

The recent succession of protests and uprisings following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of (now former) Minneapolis police officers overwhelmingly included dance as a protest tactic. While dancers have long engaged in cultural acts of resistance, this iteration in the #blacklivesmatter movement stemmed directly from the efforts of dancers/activists who participated in the protests following the deaths of Trayvon Martin, Ezell Ford, and Michael Brown. Dancer/activist/scholar/mother Shamell Bell deemed “Street Dance Activism” as a protest tool to celebrate Black Joy in the face of Black death, and renowned dance scholar Brenda Dixon-Gottschild has noted how such actions have gained increasing visibility over the last decade.

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“Flip it and Reverse it: Hip-Hop Worldwide” (a section of the Ethnomusicology Review)

“Flip it and Reverse it: Hip-Hop Worldwide” is a space for hip-hop-focused research and content. It is a section of the UCLA journal Ethnomusicology Review.

The section is open to scholars, students, journalists, activists, artists, archivists, and community organizers. We’d like to particularly encourage submissions from BIPOC individuals, LGBTQIA+ individuals, disabled individuals, and non-academically affiliated individuals.

Contributions should ideally be between 1500 and 3500 words, and take advantage of the online-digital format of the publication by making use of media content (pictures, videos, audio, etc.).

If you wish to contribute or have any questions please reach out to:

H. Samy Alim (halim@ucla.edu)

Samuel Lamontagne (slamonta@ucla.edu)

Tabia Shawel (tshawel@bunche.ucla.edu)

More info here

https://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/content/call-contributions-flip-it-and-reverse-it-hip-hop-worldwide

Ethnomusicology Review

ethnomusicologyreview.org

Savoirs en Prisme, no 15, 2022, “The Figure of the Musician in the Cinema”

Call for Articles 

Savoirs en Prisme, no 15, 2022, “The Figure of the Musician in the Cinema” 

Edited by: Bénédicte Brémard, Stéphan Etcharry and Julie Michot 

Although pianists (and even organists) left the movie theaters during the silent era, musicians have become a recurrent topic of cinema. One famous example is the first “sound” feature film, The Jazz Singer (Alan Crosland, 1927), whose hero is also an instrumentalist. Background and source music have already been the subject of numerous in-depth studies. This is why Issue 15 of Savoirs en Prisme will focus more specifically on the musician, a figure that can be found in all national cinemas.

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cfp: “New Approaches to Music and Sound,” Journal of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era (special issue)

New Approaches to Music and Sound
Guest Editors: David Suisman and Rebecca Tinio McKenna

If new book series and journal special issues are any indication, over the last decade, there has been a surge of interest in the musical and sonic worlds of the past. Scholars of music, sound studies, disability studies, transnational and postcolonial studies, cultural history, history of the senses, and others have been expanding our historical understanding of soundscapes, music cultures, aurality, acoustics, and other aspects of the work sound does in the world. New scholarship is connecting music and sound with politics and social movements, capitalism and commerce, the formation of racial, gender, and class identity and difference, the history of technology and of natural environments, and more.

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cfp: Musical Biopics and Musical Documentaries from the Scandinavian countries

Call for contributions to a Journal of Scandinavian Cinema In Focus section highlighting Musical Biopics and Musical Documentaries from the Scandinavian countries 

This is a call for short subject contributions (2000-3000 words) focusing on how Scandinavian film and television have presented musicians, singers, bands and orchestras in biopics and documentaries. We welcome submissions that – after a quick theoretical introduction and concise contextual background – offer discussions of topics such as: 

  • the film’s role within cultural memory – usually restricted to a single national market and often catering to a certain age group’s intragenerational memories 
  • the handling of generic conventions; from narration and characterization to the selection of music, casting choices and staging of performances  
  • the function of music in specific films and film genres 
  • marketing and authentification discourses, including media coverage of stars and their work with particular roles and performances, as well as screenwriters’ and directors’ use of biographies, interviews, original footage and recordings 
  • national and international reception of such films  
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Narrating Popular Music History of the GDR: A Critical Reflection of Approaches, Sources and Methods

Editors: Beate Peter (Manchester Metropolitan University, UK) and Michael Rauhut (University of Agder, Norway)

Submissions are invited for a special edition of Popular Music History that aims to assess the sources, approaches and methods with which East German popular music is written.

Background

Histories of German popular music generally focus on examples of West German music which were commercially successful and/or are considered to be aesthetically and musically ground-breaking. Bands such as Kraftwerk, Can, Neu! or the Scorpions are the subject of many academic as well as non-academic publications, and they are considered as canonical as genres such as Krautrock or Neue Deutsche Welle. East German musicians or movements, on the other hand, tend to be overlooked, as do specific artistic forms of expression which were developed in response to authoritarian leadership in the socialist German Democratic Republic (GDR). The examination of a relationship between the GDR and the arts is almost altogether absent from a pan-German popular music history.

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cfp: Enchanted Music / Musique enchantée

Fantasy and music have always been closely linked through the association of music and creative powers. Thus in Tolkien’s Ainulindalë, music gives birth to the world, and evil is first manifested as a discordant theme in the symphony the Ainur compose. In addition, The Lord of the Rings is intertwined with songs and poems, a feature that also appears in the works of post-Tolkienian writers such as Guy Gavriel Kay. Songs are often accompanied by musician characters, who might be reminiscent of the mythological figures of Orpheus, whose music charms all living beings, or the bard Taliesin who is said to have been a companion of Bran the Blessed and to have attended the court of King Arthur. Taliesin actually appears in Charles de Lint’s Urban Fantasy novel Moonheart. And musicians (along with painters and writers) are prominently featured in the works of the Canadian author, who is himself a musician and regularly explores the many faces of artistic creation and creativity. Similarly, in Emma Bull’s novel War for the Oaks, music is a complete part of the story since the main protagonist, Eddi, is a rock singer and guitarist just like the author. Other writers imagine magical music instruments, such as the Dagda’s harp in Léa Silhol’s La Sève et le Givre, or faerie characters whose musical and singing abilities are far beyond what mere humans can produce.

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cfp: Prosecuting and Policing Rap (Popular Music 40.4)

Special issue of Popular Music 40.4 (2021)

Prosecuting and Policing Rap

Contributions are invited to a special issue of Popular Music on the complex interface between rap music (taken in its broadest sense to include mainstream rap, gangsta rap, activist rap, drill, grime, etc.) and criminal justice systems around the world.

Rap music is an international youth-cultural powerhouse and, while its spread has been celebrated, it has also been attended by mounting criminalisation. This special issue asks researchers to explore the policing and prosecuting of rap and how this has been framed in media reporting. It also considers what might make rap susceptible to such state criminalisation and how rappers, communities, civil liberties groups, defence lawyers, and scholars have come to challenge ‘prosecuting rap’.

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cfp: Journal of Sound, Silence, Image and Technology

Journal of Sound, Silence, Image and Technology (JoSSIT)

Monograph: Music, Sound and Silence in Videogames

Issue editor: Lidia López Gómez

Number: 3 (December 2020)

Deadline for full articles: 1st October 2020

Issue date: 22nd December 2020

The scientific publication the Journal of Sound, Silence, Image and Technology (JoSSIT) grew out of the research group of the same name (SSIT), which is linked to the TecnoCampus university centres, affiliated with Pompeu Fabra University (UPF). The journal seeks to bring together academic debate and scientific research on the relationship between sound as a broad concept and an audiovisual context.

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Survey on musical practice during Covid-19

Dear colleagues,

How is Covid-19 changing musical instrument practice? At the University of Sussex we are running a survey exploring this question and we would be delighted if you would consider filling it out. We interpret the word ‘instrument’ broadly and take it to include the voice and music software, for example.

We are interested in everyone’s reply, no matter what background, education, practice, genre or style. Amateurs and new musicians are especially welcome, so please feel free to share with your friends, family and networks.

Filling out the survey will take between 15-30 minutes of your time, and it hopefully invites you to reflect upon the meaning of music in your life:

https://forms.gle/DXZUePc5kQUZ4kEa8

Best wishes,

Thor Magnusson and Mimi Haddon
University of Sussex, Brighton, United Kingdom