cfp: Perfect Beat

Special Edition: Metal and Hardcore in Aotearoa and the Pacific Islands

Perfect Beat: The Asia-Pacific Journal of Research into Contemporary Music and Popular Culture 

This call for proposals is for a special edition of Perfect Beat, focused on heavy metal and hardcore music, scenes, practices, and cultures in Aotearoa/New Zealand and the Pacific Islands. Metal and hardcore have a long and nuanced history in Aotearoa, where scenes have interfaced with localised aesthetics and histories, and responded to urbanisation, deindustrialisation, and globalisation in complex and multi-faceted ways. Moreover, metal and hardcore’s relationship to Māoritanga is similarly significant, despite only recently coming into greater international focus with the success of Alien Weaponry’s use of Te Reo Māori. Heavy metal and hardcore’s history in the Pacific Islands is deserving of further attention, particularly given the growth of bands such as Kūka’ilimoku in Hawai’i, the recent staging of Metal United World Wide in Papua New Guinea, and the established history of metal in the Solomon Islands.

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cfp: The Journal of Beatles Studies

The Journal of Beatles Studies 

Issue One CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Navigating and Narrating the Beatles: A Research Agenda for the 21st Century 

The prodigious interest in the Beatles and continued industry devoted to the group is exemplified by the forthcoming release of Peter Jackson’s Get Back, a revision of 1970’s Let It Be. To be screened by Disney in late 2021, the size and scope of the project is signalled by an emphasis on Jackson’s three years of labour and access to 60 hours of archive footage not seen for half a century. The perceived public appetite is measured in the results of this work which reworks Michael Lindsay-Hogg’s lean 80 minutes into six hours of documentary to be revealed over three days in a global televisual event. 

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Call for submissions, Women and Music

Women & Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture is now accepting submissions for volume 26 (2022). The journal is particularly interested in work that provides a critical perspective on music and/or sound, and in work that considers the role of gender, sexuality, race, citizenship, class, or other cultural and social factors in the production, circulation, historicization, or consumption of music. Women & Music is an annual publication, published by the University of Nebraska Press.

The journal welcomes stand-alone academic articles, as well as shorter, thematically-linked pieces, poetry, original artwork, and short scores or musical extracts that have not been previously published. Stand-alone articles are typically 6K-10K words; longer pieces may be considered in consultation with the editor. Scores should be no more than five pages long, and formatted to fit the 7 ¼” x 4 ¼” printed area of the journal’s pages. Musical contributions should be written by female-identifiying composers or address issues of gender or sexuality in some form.

Submissions should be sent by July 7th to WAM’s Editorial Collective at WAMjournal@gmail.com, which includes Lisa Barg (McGill University), Kimberley White (McGill University), and Vanessa Blais-Tremblay (Université du Québec à Montréal). Books for review should be sent to the Book Review Editor; for the mailing address contact Laura Risk (University of Toronto-Scarborough) directly at laura.risk@utoronto.ca

“Education Sciences & Society” Journal – Italy

Dear IASPMites,

I’m happy to share with you the last call for papers from the Italian scientific Journal “Education Sciences & Society”: https://journals.francoangeli.it/index.php/ess/announcement/view/37

Professor Massimiliano Stramaglia and I we’ll be glad if you consider participating with a paper about the way pop music can help to clarify the meaning of being young today.

Thank you very much for your kind attention!

Tommaso Farina

cfp: Special Issue of Journal of Global Hip Hop Studies on ‘The Fifth Element’

CfP: Special Issue of Global Hip Hop Studies Journal: 

“Knowledge Reigns Supreme”: The Fifth Element in Hip Hop Culture (2022) 

Co-edited by Justin A. Williams, Sina A. Nitzsche, and Darren Chetty 

The Journal 

Global Hip Hop Studies (GHHS) is a peer-reviewed, rigorous and community-responsive academic journal that publishes research on contemporary as well as historical issues and debates that surround hip hop music and culture around the world.  

The Special Issue 

Deejaying. Emceeing. Breaking. Graffiti. These are commonly considered hip hop’s four core elements. While hip hop contains multiple elements beyond its core, many hip hop artists, activists, and fans worldwide understand and recognize a ‘fifth element’ as knowledge. This naming practice shows us how hip hop communities understand the importance of the history, values, and artistry of the culture beyond their own temporal-spatial borders. With roots in the Universal Zulu Nation in the 1970s (Chang 2005), hip hop’s fifth element includes aims of self-realization (‘knowledge of self’), empowerment, and information about the history of the genre and its key practitioners (Gosa 2015; Alim, Haupt, Williams 2018).  

 This special issue of Global Hip Hop Studies thus addresses questions about the role of knowledge in global hip hop culture: How is it mediated across other elements, social groups, and cultural borders? How is knowledge passed on from one hip hop generation to another? What is the role of hip hop knowledge in educational institutions around the globe and how can it be used for the benefit of artists and the community? What can we as researchers, activists, and artists learn from knowledge practices in global hip hop culture?  

We invite contributions from a variety of disciplines, including musicology, pedagogy, cultural studies, ethnomusicology, visual studies, media studies, history, sociology, and other relevant fields. We are particularly keen to bring artists and scholars together to co-produce new methods for hip hop education while welcoming a wide range of perspectives and definitions around the intentionally-broad concept of hip hop’s fifth element.  

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cfp: AHHE – Faculties and futures for the arts and humanities in higher education

Call for Papers
Special Issue in Arts and Humanities in Higher Education
‘In the name of employability: faculties and futures for the arts and humanities in higher

education’

Guest Editors
Dr Daniel Ashton (University of Southampton, UK)
Professor Dawn Bennett (Bond University, Australia)
Dr Zoe Hope Bulaitis (University of Birmingham, UK)
Dr Michael Tomlinson (University of Southampton, UK)

Background

This special issue aims to examine the faculties and futures of the arts and humanities within the context of global labour market and higher education reforms. We ask contributors to
consider the role of the arts and humanities within the context of work and society, both now and in the near future; the visions and versions of employability that are invoked and responded to within the arts and humanities; and the solutions which might enable the arts and humanities to regain or reframe their centrality. Ten years ago, the edited collection The Public Value of the Humanities (Bate, 2011) suggested that ‘recession is a time for asking fundamental questions about value’ and the contributors did just that with their reflections on the public value of arts and humanities disciplines. This 2021 special issue seeks to examine the intricate connections and global challenges of ongoing recession, pandemic, climate change, national populism, intersectional inequalities, and more. A 2021 review in response to this panoply of crises is an opportunity to explore the continued and growing value of arts and humanities in higher education. It is also clear that this timely exposition and exchange is situated in the idea of what the arts and humanities can offer (Reisz, 2020). As governments and higher education  institutions address the ongoing impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic, the value of a university degree continues to be a disputed and debated field. Graduate destinations and employment outcomes have long been factored into the accounts of value and consequences when it comes to the role and function of the arts and humanities higher education (British Academy, 2017; Britton et al., 2020). At the same time, there has been considerable debate and reflection on the economic and social purposes of higher education (McArthur, 2011). Current governmental policy concerning higher education management firmly identifies the question of value with employment. For example, the recent interim response to the UK’s “Post-18 Review of Education and Funding” (Augar, 2020) highlights that skills and jobs are the priority in terms of government engagement in HE reform (DfE, 2021). The emphasis in the UK is on ‘strong graduate employment  outcomes’ (see Adams, 2020) and in Australia, as elsewhere, there is similar identification of the need for ‘job ready graduates’ (Grattan, 2020). The terms of this discussion are reinforced in the responses and reports from a range of scholarly and policy organisations. This special issue explores the position and potential futures for the arts and humanities within this context. Building on the 2017 report The Right Skills, the British Academy’s Qualified for the Future report (2020) sets out how ‘graduates who study arts, humanities and social science disciplines are highly employable across a range of sectors and roles’ with recognised skills of ‘communication, collaboration, research and analysis, independence, creativity and adaptability’. Similarly,  recent data from Forbes (Marr, 2019) and LinkedIn (2019, 2020) demonstrate that industry recognises the benefits of employees with skills learned and developed through critical thinking and creative activity. This also resonates with employers’ discourses around soft skills and other behavioural competencies that add value to workplaces. The ongoing social and economic shifts taking place during the global pandemic will undoubtably influence the skills that are valued in the labour market.

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Rolling call for blog posts, LGBTQ+ Music Study Group

LGBTQ+ Music Study Group

Are you a student or early career researcher with some ideas about queer musicology you would like to share? Then, we’d love to hear from you!

The LGBTQ+ Music Study Group is currently looking for new submissions for our online blog. Submissions can take the form of an essay or any other sort of creative response such as a video essay, a composition, a poem, or a piece of creative non-fiction. We want to uplift the new and exciting voices in the field of queer and trans music studies, so if you have some thoughts to share, we would love to hear them! We especially welcome submissions from BIPOC scholars and musicians and those that address issues of race, ethnicity, and intersectionality.

Submissions are carefully peer-reviewed by an editing committee. For written submissions, we suggest a 1000 word-count, but the limits are truly endless! If you are interested, please send a 200-word abstract to thomas.r.hilder@ntnu.no and we will get back to you shortly. We look forward to hearing from you!

Check out our blog here.

cfp: Breaking and the Olympics, Special Issue of Global Hip Hop Studies Journal

Dear IASPM Colleagues:

Please find the link below for a Special Issue of Global Hip Hop Studies about Breaking and the Olympics.

We are especially interested in teams of researchers coming together to do community-responsive projects in preparation for the upcoming Olympics in 2024:

https://www.intellectbooks.com/asset/56064/1/Global_Hip_Hop_Studies_Call_for_Papers_Feb_21.pdf

Journal of Popular Music Studies news

Hi there IASPMites,

Just a few things to run by you from the world of Journal of Popular Music Studies as we kick off 2021. Our book series resumes tomorrow with Daphne Brooks, in conversation with Farah Jasmine Griffin and Gayle Wald, talking about her Liner Notes for the Revolution: The Intellectual Life of Black Feminist Sound, coming out next month on Harvard Press. We have a jampacked set of offerings: look for the schedule here:
http://iaspm-us.net/journal-of-popular-music-studies/books-in-process-series/

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European Music Analysis and the Politics of Identity

Special issue of Danish Musicology

Online Editors: Thomas Jul Kirkegaard-Larsen and Mikkel Vad

Since the 1980s, questions of identity markers such as gender, race, and class, have become a central focus of research and academic debates in areas such as musicology, ethnomusicology, musical anthropology and sociology, popular music studies, and many more. In the wake of Philip Ewell’s article on “Music Theory and the White Racial Frame” (2020), such longstanding conversations have been amplified while gaining new momentum in the areas of music theory and music analysis. The debate surrounding Ewell’s critique of music theory’s white racial frame in general, and Heinrich Schenker’s Anglo-American legacy in particular, have mainly taken place in a US context where “Music Theory” (closely related to the practice of music analysis) functions as a discipline independent from “Musicology” and “Ethnomusicology.” As the debate has gained international attention, however, it remains an open question how, to what extent, and under what circumstances the US debates about music theory are pertinent in Europe: on the one hand, music theory and music analysis are practiced in ways that differ significantly from the American scholarly tradition, not just because Heinrich Schenker’s influence has been very limited, but also because theory and analysis are often conceived of as integrated subdisciplines of musicology rather than independ- ent areas of research and education; on the other hand, we contend that questions of whiteness, Eurocentrism, race, gender, sexism, and more, are no less important in a European context, and that time is ripe for a fruitful scholarly discussion of these issues in music analysis, music theory, and related fields of music studies. In this special issue we invite scholars and practitioners of music analysis to reflect upon the role of race, ethnicity, nation, class, gender, and sexuality in a European context. For the purposes of the special issue, we conceive of music analysis, widely, as a scholarly and pedagogical practice engaging with sounding musical material or notated music in the fields of music theory, music history, ethnomusicology, dance studies, and sound studies, as well as related interdisciplinary fields.  
We invite manuscript submissions on topics including, but not limited to, the following: –  Whiteness–  Racism, sexism, classism–  Ethnicity and nationality–  Decolonization and antiracism–  Diversity, equity, and inclusion in music analysis–  Music theory and analysis in education–  Non-Western music theory and music analysis–  Case studies of previously marginalized individuals/peoples/repertoires/theorists–  Comparative studies of different analytical traditions–  Historical perspectives on music theory/music analysis/musicology–  Methodology and analytical techniques; hermeneutics and critique–  Vernacular music theory and public musicology–  Challenges to analytical universalism and objectivity
Submission may be in one of two formats: a) peer-reviewed article; b) colloquy contribution (1000–4000 words, subject to editorial review). Upon submission, please indicate clearly which category your manuscript falls in. Submit manuscripts by June 1 2021 to
Thomas Jul Kirkegaard-Larsen tki@natmus.dk or Mikkel Vad vadxx03@umn.edu. Manuscripts should follow the guidelines set by DMO: http://danishmusicologyonline.dk/vejledning.html danishmusicologyonline.dk