REMINDER – Call for Chapters – Progressive Rock, Metal and the Literary Imagination (extended deadline)

Progressive Rock, Metal, and the Literary Imagination

Chris Anderton and Lori Burns, editors

Progressive Rock, Metal, and the Literary Imagination will present analyses of progressive rock and metal music that reveals a striking engagement with literary texts and themes – from classic literature, mythology and poetry to science fiction, horror, and other genres. While many of the extant publications on progressive rock and metal have focused on the history of progressive rock, few have examined the ways that it intersects with the literary imagination, whether drawing on myths, legends, and stories as source material, or using storytelling modes to create new stories and worlds. Progressive rock musicians have often created concept albums based around these source materials and worlds, and they offer more than simply fantasy and escapism, with narratives and themes that comment on the social, cultural, and political milieux in which they are made.

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SEM Journal of Audiovisual Ethnomusicology – Call for Submissions

The Journal of Audiovisual Ethnomusicology (JAVEM) is a newly established, bi-annual, peer-reviewed streaming journal of ethnomusicological film and video sponsored by the Society for Ethnomusicology.

JAVEM aims to advance the use of video/film as a method for exploring music and its entanglements, and as a medium for presenting those explorations.

We invite the submission to JAVEM of original audiovisual contributions.

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cfp: Exploring Audio and Music Technology in Education

Special Issue: ‘Exploring Audio and Music Technology in Education: Pedagogical, Research and Sociocultural Perspectives’

Full paper submission deadline: 1 April 2022

The past decade has seen increased interest in the pedagogical facets of audio engineering, sound design, music technology and related fields. Much of this rising interest in the teaching and learning aspects of sound corresponds to a growing number of institutions offering training options for people interested in the technical, creative, scientific and cultural aspects of audio. However, while the options for learning about such topics have expanded, there remains a dearth of scholarship on the theoretical, sociocultural and interdisciplinary aspects of audio and its connection to teaching and learning in a broad array of institutions. Also, little scholarship has emphasized a professional development model for the educational aspects of audio, particularly for those working with the next generation of practitioners in all educational contexts. What impact do audio and music corporations have on facilities and curricular decision-making? For this Special Issue of the Journal of Music, Technology & Education, the guest editors seek contributions addressing one or more of the topics below:

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Reminder: M/C Journal cfp: ‘Cities’

M/C Journal: ‘Cities’ CFP

Over the past 20 years, interest in the ways in which cities might be re-imagined and place-branded through specific creative and cultural identities and activities has increased exponentially (Landry; Andersson; Evans; Grodach), with urban policy-makers in particular seeking to find ways to leverage these identities to drive a range of urban development, economic, heritage, and tourism initiatives (Richards; Baker; Martinez; Ballico and Watson). In turn, significant attention has been given to the vital contribution creative workers make to the creative, cultural, and economic fabric of cities, with policies aimed at attracting these workers becoming a central tenet of many creative city strategies (Florida). To this end, urban development strategies prefaced on the enactment of a range of ‘creative’ and ‘cultural’ frameworks are commonplace in cities across the world. Examples of this include the UNESCO Creative Cities Network, which encompasses creative sectors as diverse as Crafts and Folk Art, Design, Film, Gastronomy, Literature, Media Arts, and Music (Ballico and Carter), as well as other sector-specific frameworks such as the global music cities movement (Baker; Ballico and Watson). Considering the emergence, circulation, and adoption of these policy frameworks, as well as more broadly the ways in which creative and cultural identities can be leveraged through place activation strategies, we invite contributions that provide, although are not limited to:

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CFA for Festival Activism, due by November 20

Abstracts due by November 20 for Festival Activism! 

For decades festivals have provided important sites of inquiry for folklorists and ethnomusicologists alike. While theoretically and methodologically diverse, this literature has traditionally focused on the communitas of festival experience and the flow of everyday social life beyond the festival’s liminal boundaries. Attending to the activist turn in ethnographic research, we wish to explore the idea of festivals as strategic forms of social action. Specifically, how can a critical ethnographic study of festivals reveal the ways in which performers, participants, and organizers encounter and challenge the myriad forms of violence that frame the contemporary world? How do festivals constitute sites of activism and forms of social and political intervention?    

Co-Editors David A. McDonald and Jeremy Reed of Indiana University and Andrew Snyder of Universidade Nova de Lisboa are seeking chapter proposals that explore existing and emerging debates on the dynamics of festivals and activism. This volume understands festivals as an interspace between disciplines such as folklore, ethnomusicology, performance studies, cultural studies, media studies, and others. At the same time, an attentive and critically ethnographic approach to festival can offer utility to professional fields beyond the social sciences, such as arts administration and public affairs. We welcome original research that explores the significance of festivals as tools of social and political intervention. And further, we encourage chapter proposals that integrate festival research into contemporary conversations on applied, activist, and public facing work in the humanities.     
    
We envision this volume published as part of IU Press’ “Activist Encounters in Folklore and Ethnomusicology” book series. If interested in participating, please send a 250 word abstract to David McDonald davmcdon@indiana.edu, Jeremy Reed reedjer@indiana.edu, or Andrew Snyder asnyder@fcsh.unl.pt by November 20, 2021. Finished chapter drafts will be expected by May 1, 2022 with final revisions expected in Fall 2022.   

cfp: The Chiptune Studies Reader

With apologies for crossposting

Call for chapters: The Chiptune Studies Reader

Dear Colleagues,

We are excited to announce that we are seeking contributions for The Chiptune Studies Reader, an interdisciplinary peer-reviewed and edited volume on chiptune – or ‘chipmusic’ and ‘micromusic’ as it is also known – which we intend to publish through Oxford University Press. Rooted in the emergence of video game audio technology, and subsequently re-routed through the subversive musicality of an underground participatory culture, chiptune is a form of electronic music that has blossomed into a global phenomenon over the course of nearly four decades. Today, the umbrella term ‘chiptune’ subsumes an ever-growing plethora of (sub)genres, practices, and a heterogeneous worldwide following, whose musical output is as creatively playful and diverse as it is distinct by way of its mediation. Chiptune’s technologies, timbral palettes, and associated iconography have grown rapidly in their accessibility, playability, and ubiquity, and have become woven into pop-cultural imaginaries far beyond their own humble beginnings in the music of video games’ past.                           

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cfp: Progressive Rock, Metal, and the Literary Imagination

CFP—now open

Available here: https://www.progectnetwork.com/call-for-papers

Progressive Rock, Metal, and the Literary Imagination

Chris Anderton and Lori Burns, editors

Progressive Rock, Metal, and the Literary Imagination will present analyses of progressive rock and metal music that reveals a striking engagement with literary texts and themes – from classic literature, mythology and poetry to science fiction, horror, and other genres. While many of the extant publications on progressive rock and metal have focused on the history of progressive rock, few have examined the ways that it intersects with the literary imagination, whether drawing on myths, legends, and stories as source material, or using storytelling modes to create new stories and worlds. Progressive rock musicians have often created concept albums based around these source materials and worlds, and they offer more than simply fantasy and escapism, with narratives and themes that comment on the social, cultural, and political milieux in which they are made.

Continue reading

cfp: European Music Analysis and the Politics of Identity

A kind reminder of this fast approaching deadline October 1. The special issue is accepting peer-reviewed articles as well as shorter colloquy contributions. If you are considering submitting a piece, do not hesitate to contact the editors with any questions.

European Music Analysis and the Politics of Identity – Special Issue of Danish Musicology Online

In the wake of the North American scholar Philip Ewell’s critique of music theory’s white racial frame, questions of race, gender, class, and more have been amplified and gained new momentum in the areas of music theory and music analysis. But how, to what extent, and under what circumstances are such debates on the identity politics of music theory pertinent in Europe? Time is ripe for a fruitful scholarly discussion of these issues in music analysis, music theory, and related fields of music studies within a European context!

The guest editors of the special issue are Thomas Jul Kirkegaard-Larsen and Mikkel Vad.

Please read the full call for papers here: http://www.danishmusicologyonline.dk/downloads/call_for_papers/dmo_call_for_papers_special_issue_2022.pdf

cfp: Festival Activism

Call for Proposals: Festival Activism
Edited by David McDonald and Jeremy Reed

For decades festivals have provided important sites of inquiry for folklorists and ethnomusicologists alike. While theoretically and methodologically diverse, this literature has traditionally focused on the communitas of festival experience and the flow of everyday social life beyond the festival’s liminal boundaries. Attending to the activist turn in ethnographic research, we wish to explore the idea of festivals as strategic forms of social action. Specifically, how can a critical ethnographic study of festivals reveal the ways in which performers, participants, and organizers encounter and challenge the myriad forms of violence that frame the contemporary world? How do festivals constitute sites of activism and forms of social and political intervention?

Co-Editors David A. McDonald and Jeremy Reed of Indiana University are seeking chapter proposals that explore existing and emerging debates on the dynamics of festivals and activism. This volume understands festivals as an interspace between disciplines such as folklore, ethnomusicology, performance studies, cultural studies, media studies, and others. At the same time, an attentive and critically ethnographic approach to festivals can offer utility to professional fields beyond the social sciences, such as arts administration and public affairs. We welcome original research that explores the significance of festivals as tools of social and political intervention. And further, we encourage chapter proposals that integrate festival research into contemporary conversations on applied, activist, and public facing work in the humanities.  

We envision this volume published as part of IU Press’ “Activist Encounters in Folklore and Ethnomusicology” book series. If interested in participating, please send a 250 word abstract to David McDonald davmcdon@indiana.edu and Jeremy Reed reedjer@indiana.edu by November 20, 2021. Finished chapter drafts will be expected by May 1, 2022 with final revisions expected in Fall 2022. 

cfp: Perfect Beat

Special Edition: Metal and Hardcore in Aotearoa and the Pacific Islands

Perfect Beat: The Asia-Pacific Journal of Research into Contemporary Music and Popular Culture 

This call for proposals is for a special edition of Perfect Beat, focused on heavy metal and hardcore music, scenes, practices, and cultures in Aotearoa/New Zealand and the Pacific Islands. Metal and hardcore have a long and nuanced history in Aotearoa, where scenes have interfaced with localised aesthetics and histories, and responded to urbanisation, deindustrialisation, and globalisation in complex and multi-faceted ways. Moreover, metal and hardcore’s relationship to Māoritanga is similarly significant, despite only recently coming into greater international focus with the success of Alien Weaponry’s use of Te Reo Māori. Heavy metal and hardcore’s history in the Pacific Islands is deserving of further attention, particularly given the growth of bands such as Kūka’ilimoku in Hawai’i, the recent staging of Metal United World Wide in Papua New Guinea, and the established history of metal in the Solomon Islands.

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