Rolling call for blog posts, LGBTQ+ Music Study Group

LGBTQ+ Music Study Group

Are you a student or early career researcher with some ideas about queer musicology you would like to share? Then, we’d love to hear from you!

The LGBTQ+ Music Study Group is currently looking for new submissions for our online blog. Submissions can take the form of an essay or any other sort of creative response such as a video essay, a composition, a poem, or a piece of creative non-fiction. We want to uplift the new and exciting voices in the field of queer and trans music studies, so if you have some thoughts to share, we would love to hear them! We especially welcome submissions from BIPOC scholars and musicians and those that address issues of race, ethnicity, and intersectionality.

Submissions are carefully peer-reviewed by an editing committee. For written submissions, we suggest a 1000 word-count, but the limits are truly endless! If you are interested, please send a 200-word abstract to thomas.r.hilder@ntnu.no and we will get back to you shortly. We look forward to hearing from you!

Check out our blog here.

cfp: Breaking and the Olympics, Special Issue of Global Hip Hop Studies Journal

Dear IASPM Colleagues:

Please find the link below for a Special Issue of Global Hip Hop Studies about Breaking and the Olympics.

We are especially interested in teams of researchers coming together to do community-responsive projects in preparation for the upcoming Olympics in 2024:

https://www.intellectbooks.com/asset/56064/1/Global_Hip_Hop_Studies_Call_for_Papers_Feb_21.pdf

Journal of Popular Music Studies news

Hi there IASPMites,

Just a few things to run by you from the world of Journal of Popular Music Studies as we kick off 2021. Our book series resumes tomorrow with Daphne Brooks, in conversation with Farah Jasmine Griffin and Gayle Wald, talking about her Liner Notes for the Revolution: The Intellectual Life of Black Feminist Sound, coming out next month on Harvard Press. We have a jampacked set of offerings: look for the schedule here:
http://iaspm-us.net/journal-of-popular-music-studies/books-in-process-series/

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European Music Analysis and the Politics of Identity

Special issue of Danish Musicology

Online Editors: Thomas Jul Kirkegaard-Larsen and Mikkel Vad

Since the 1980s, questions of identity markers such as gender, race, and class, have become a central focus of research and academic debates in areas such as musicology, ethnomusicology, musical anthropology and sociology, popular music studies, and many more. In the wake of Philip Ewell’s article on “Music Theory and the White Racial Frame” (2020), such longstanding conversations have been amplified while gaining new momentum in the areas of music theory and music analysis. The debate surrounding Ewell’s critique of music theory’s white racial frame in general, and Heinrich Schenker’s Anglo-American legacy in particular, have mainly taken place in a US context where “Music Theory” (closely related to the practice of music analysis) functions as a discipline independent from “Musicology” and “Ethnomusicology.” As the debate has gained international attention, however, it remains an open question how, to what extent, and under what circumstances the US debates about music theory are pertinent in Europe: on the one hand, music theory and music analysis are practiced in ways that differ significantly from the American scholarly tradition, not just because Heinrich Schenker’s influence has been very limited, but also because theory and analysis are often conceived of as integrated subdisciplines of musicology rather than independ- ent areas of research and education; on the other hand, we contend that questions of whiteness, Eurocentrism, race, gender, sexism, and more, are no less important in a European context, and that time is ripe for a fruitful scholarly discussion of these issues in music analysis, music theory, and related fields of music studies. In this special issue we invite scholars and practitioners of music analysis to reflect upon the role of race, ethnicity, nation, class, gender, and sexuality in a European context. For the purposes of the special issue, we conceive of music analysis, widely, as a scholarly and pedagogical practice engaging with sounding musical material or notated music in the fields of music theory, music history, ethnomusicology, dance studies, and sound studies, as well as related interdisciplinary fields.  
We invite manuscript submissions on topics including, but not limited to, the following: –  Whiteness–  Racism, sexism, classism–  Ethnicity and nationality–  Decolonization and antiracism–  Diversity, equity, and inclusion in music analysis–  Music theory and analysis in education–  Non-Western music theory and music analysis–  Case studies of previously marginalized individuals/peoples/repertoires/theorists–  Comparative studies of different analytical traditions–  Historical perspectives on music theory/music analysis/musicology–  Methodology and analytical techniques; hermeneutics and critique–  Vernacular music theory and public musicology–  Challenges to analytical universalism and objectivity
Submission may be in one of two formats: a) peer-reviewed article; b) colloquy contribution (1000–4000 words, subject to editorial review). Upon submission, please indicate clearly which category your manuscript falls in. Submit manuscripts by June 1 2021 to
Thomas Jul Kirkegaard-Larsen tki@natmus.dk or Mikkel Vad vadxx03@umn.edu. Manuscripts should follow the guidelines set by DMO: http://danishmusicologyonline.dk/vejledning.html danishmusicologyonline.dk

Punk Passages: Punk, Ageing and Time – Call for Chapter Proposals

Writers are invited to submit chapter proposals for an edited collection of work exploring ageing, time and temporality in the context of punk.

Initial academic consideration of punk posited it as a youth culture and the positioning of punk in relation to time and historical location is of course commonplace in scholarship. This can be seen outside of academia too, for example the ‘celebration’ of the 40th anniversary of punk and the associated events which took place highlight the way punk is often link with a particular time in our collective memory. Just as punk scholarship has endeavoured to deal with the notion of punk retaining significance in individuals’ lives ‘post-youth’, empirical work has built around how punk is remembered and represented. And yet…tensions, issues and gaps remain unaddressed.

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cfp: Special issue of The Radio Journal: ‘Competing Sounds? Podcasting and Popular Music’

Special issue of The Radio Journal: ‘Competing Sounds? Podcasting and Popular Music’

Guest editors: Ellis Jones (University of Oslo) and Jeremy Morris (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
Abstracts due: 20th January 2021

On 19 May 2020, Spotify announced they had secured worldwide rights to distribute The Joe Rogan Show – arguably the world’s most commercially successful podcast – exclusively through their streaming platform. This move, reportedly worth over $100m, follows a series of notable licensing deals and acquisitions by Spotify (e.g. Gimlet Media, Anchor, The Obamas, etc.). But the heavy investment in this emerging media format also puts podcasts and music in economic and cultural tension. Noting the paltry royalties Spotify distributes to musicians, jazz historian Ted Gioja scoffed that the Rogan deal shows ‘Spotify values Rogan more than any musician in the history of the world.’

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cfp: IASPM Journal – Dance & Protest Special Issue

Special Issue CFP: Dance and Protest

Editors: Serouj Aprahamian, Shamell Bell, Rachael Gunn, and MiRi Park

IASPM Journal is the peer-reviewed open-access e-journal of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM). As part of an international network, the journal aims to publish research and analysis in the field of popular music studies at both global and local levels.

The recent succession of protests and uprisings following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of (now former) Minneapolis police officers overwhelmingly included dance as a protest tactic. While dancers have long engaged in cultural acts of resistance, this iteration in the #blacklivesmatter movement stemmed directly from the efforts of dancers/activists who participated in the protests following the deaths of Trayvon Martin, Ezell Ford, and Michael Brown. Dancer/activist/scholar/mother Shamell Bell deemed “Street Dance Activism” as a protest tool to celebrate Black Joy in the face of Black death, and renowned dance scholar Brenda Dixon-Gottschild has noted how such actions have gained increasing visibility over the last decade.

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“Flip it and Reverse it: Hip-Hop Worldwide” (a section of the Ethnomusicology Review)

“Flip it and Reverse it: Hip-Hop Worldwide” is a space for hip-hop-focused research and content. It is a section of the UCLA journal Ethnomusicology Review.

The section is open to scholars, students, journalists, activists, artists, archivists, and community organizers. We’d like to particularly encourage submissions from BIPOC individuals, LGBTQIA+ individuals, disabled individuals, and non-academically affiliated individuals.

Contributions should ideally be between 1500 and 3500 words, and take advantage of the online-digital format of the publication by making use of media content (pictures, videos, audio, etc.).

If you wish to contribute or have any questions please reach out to:

H. Samy Alim (halim@ucla.edu)

Samuel Lamontagne (slamonta@ucla.edu)

Tabia Shawel (tshawel@bunche.ucla.edu)

More info here

https://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/content/call-contributions-flip-it-and-reverse-it-hip-hop-worldwide

Ethnomusicology Review

ethnomusicologyreview.org

Savoirs en Prisme, no 15, 2022, “The Figure of the Musician in the Cinema”

Call for Articles 

Savoirs en Prisme, no 15, 2022, “The Figure of the Musician in the Cinema” 

Edited by: Bénédicte Brémard, Stéphan Etcharry and Julie Michot 

Although pianists (and even organists) left the movie theaters during the silent era, musicians have become a recurrent topic of cinema. One famous example is the first “sound” feature film, The Jazz Singer (Alan Crosland, 1927), whose hero is also an instrumentalist. Background and source music have already been the subject of numerous in-depth studies. This is why Issue 15 of Savoirs en Prisme will focus more specifically on the musician, a figure that can be found in all national cinemas.

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cfp: “New Approaches to Music and Sound,” Journal of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era (special issue)

New Approaches to Music and Sound
Guest Editors: David Suisman and Rebecca Tinio McKenna

If new book series and journal special issues are any indication, over the last decade, there has been a surge of interest in the musical and sonic worlds of the past. Scholars of music, sound studies, disability studies, transnational and postcolonial studies, cultural history, history of the senses, and others have been expanding our historical understanding of soundscapes, music cultures, aurality, acoustics, and other aspects of the work sound does in the world. New scholarship is connecting music and sound with politics and social movements, capitalism and commerce, the formation of racial, gender, and class identity and difference, the history of technology and of natural environments, and more.

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