cfp: Independent Music Labels: Histories, Practices and Values

Independent Music Labels: Histories, Practices and Values

03-04.12.2020 | Lisbon | NOVA FCSH

Within the field of popular music studies, little attention has been given to the impacts of independent music labels outside the Anglo-Saxon context, particularly in the production, dissemination and consumption of music in semi-peripheral countries such as Portugal. On the other hand, when the scope of the reflection goes beyond the Anglo-Saxon context the study of major record companies has been privileged over small structures of local / national scope which operate independently from these large companies and/or media groups with a transnational reach. Starting from broader discussions about the relationship between the local and the global in music production, this colloquium proposes a discussion on the impact of independent music labels with a particular focus on the Portuguese context and/or in contexts that are similarly located outside the main production centers. We will take as a starting point some recognized (yet open to scrutiny) assumptions about independent labels in the field of music production: the dissemination and making available of local musics and artists in opposition to the hegemony of global (mostly Anglo-Saxon) artists and genres released by multinationals; the valuing of aesthetic and artistic dimensions in music making at the expense of its commercial potential; the forms of organization and work that are innovative and adaptable to the changing contexts in the record sector, particularly in the new millennium. This is an inter and multidisciplinary colloquium accepting proposals in disciplines such as musicology, ethnomusicology, sociology, anthropology and history, among others. We also hope to establish a dialogue between the academy and the record sector with the presence and participation of independent label managers.

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cfp: Transformational POP. 4th IASPM D-A-CH Conference, 22-24 October, Paderborn

call for papers

Transformational POP

Transitions, Breaks, and Crises in Popular Music (Studies)

4th Biennial IASPM D-A-CH Conference, 22–24 October 2020

Paderborn University/Germany, Faculty of Humanities and Arts, Department of Music – Popular Music and Media

Organizational Committee: IASPM D-A-CH Executive Committee and Advisory Board +  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Beate Flath, Prof. Dr. Christoph Jacke, Manuel Troike (Local hosts)

Pop music cultures, in their entire breadth, are seismographs of social, political, economic, ecological, media, artistic, and technological transformations. In and through them, fields of tensions, disruptions, and lines of conflict become not only visible, audible and perceptible, but also communicable and thus, negotiable. Economic and ecological crises, social structural changes, political shifts, communicative-media discourses, atmospheric moods, and disturbances of the most diverse kind cannot be appreciated in isolation from specific sounds, performances, lyrics, images, stars, genres, etc. Therefore, these are always changing in the process: pop music cultures transform and are themselves transformed. “Pop is transformational, always. It is a dynamic movement in which cultural materials and its social environments mutually reshape each other, crossing previously fixed boundaries: class boundaries, ethnic boundaries or cultural boundaries [own translation].“ (Diedrich Diederichsen, Pop – deskriptiv, normativ, emphatisch (1996). In: Charis Goer, Stefan Greif, Christoph Jacke (Eds.): Texte zur Theorie des Pop, 2013: 188)

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cfp: Transcultural Hip-Hop

CALL FOR PAPERS

Transcultural Hip-Hop: Constructing and Contesting Identity, Space, and Place in the Americas and beyond

University of Bern, Switzerland, October 30 – 31, 2020

Almost fifty years after its birth, hip-hop is considered a truly global phenomenon that combines elements of uniformity with local symbols and expressions regarding musical forms, lyrics, performances, and social content. It can be said that within the US context, hip-hop emerged during the 1970s as an African American subculture. However, from its very beginning hip-hop has been a highly transcultural and hybrid phenomenon that integrates various musical elements and forms of cultural expression. In addition to African American popular culture, for example, Caribbean and Latin American music styles, language and dance played a vital role in the formation and development of hip-hop on both coasts of the US. The entanglement of diverse cultures and diasporas on the evolution of hip-hop as a music and as a movement, in the urban settings of New York and Los Angeles, for example, encourages us to think of these different musical, cultural, and social traits in more fluid or hybrid terms. 

Furthermore, diasporic identity in the multicultural neighborhoods where hip-hop first emerged is also fluid concerning the interaction between diasporic “peripheries” and their centers of origin. This conference aims to focus on the transcultural, inter-ethnic and diasporic exchanges that created hip-hop and helped to spread it within the US and beyond. The conference asks how identity markers bound by ethnic, cultural, and spatial categories are being negotiated in hip-hop. While concentrating on the Americas, the conference will also include papers that focus on other world regions and on transregional entanglements.

Within the framework of transculturality, the organizers wish to focus on three principal areas of enquiry:

A. Identity Politics in Hip-Hop

In the context of US hip-hop, many scholars argue that hip-hop should be understood with regard to its African American “centrality” (Ogbar 2007; Perry 2004). While this is not disputed by the conference organizers per se, we ask how can we better understand the hybridity of hip-hop music and culture, both at its point of origin, and as a global phenomenon? Furthermore, how do other minority groups and diasporas draw upon ´African American´ cultural markers to legitimate their contributions to the genre? How do local and global hip-hop movements reproduce and adapt such identity markers to different social and political contexts and agendas? In doing so, notions of identity and authenticity are contested and broadened over time.

B. Movement, Reproduction and Hybridity of Cultural Signifiers in Hip-Hop

Following on from these themes and borrowing from Appadurai’s (1996) understanding of cultural flows or ‘scapes’ in an era of globalization, one way of understanding the myriad creations of hybrid identity constructions in hip-hop is to identify and unpack the reproduction and merging of cultural signifiers, be they musical, visual, linguistic or otherwise. Which cultural symbols are (re-)produced in a particular context, and how do local or national cultural forms interact with transnational and global cultural flows? How does cultural politics shape the negotiation of cultural signifiers? Finally, for minority groups establishing themselves in different diasporic contexts, what is their relationship with their home or national culture from afar, and how do they shape the transcultural dynamics of centers of hip-hop production?

C. Space & Place in Hip-Hop

Like no other musical genre, hip-hop reflects a unique importance of space and identity(Rose 1994; Forman 2002). From its very inception in New York City, representing one’s neighborhood at battles was a central part of hip-hop culture. When Los Angeles became the center of gangster rap in the late 1980s, African American and Latino rap artists highlighted the intermingling of hip-hop with gang culture on the West Coast. The East Coast/West Coast feud in the mid-1990s, culminating in the deaths of Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls, pointed to the collision of geographical and musical spaces when negotiating spatial identities and affiliations. Thus, in its myriad forms and expressions in the US and around the globe, hip-hop’s “powerful ties to place” (Forman 2002) are omnipresent and reflected by artist names, languages and local slang as well as references to specific geographical markers and signature musical styles of a particular locality. How are common issues of marginalization and contested localities being negotiated in hiphop? What can these place-identities tell us about the political, socio-geographic and cultural context hip-hop culture is produced in?

The conference will be held in English and prospective participants should please send a title and abstract of up to 300 words to keith.cann@hist.unibe.ch by March 15, 2020.

Travel and accommodation costs will be covered thanks to funding from the Swiss National Science Foundation.

cfp: KISMIF Conference in Porto 2020 + Summer School 2020

We are organizing the fifth KISMIF Conference, happening in Porto, 8-11 July 2020. The conference will take place in The Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the University of Porto, Casa da Música and Rivoli Municipal Theatre of Porto, among others, for four days of multidisciplinary presentations and discussions about “DIY Cultures and Global Challenges”.

On July 7th Rivoli Municipal Theatre of Porto will also host the Summer School ‘Not Just Holidays in the Sun’ which will offer an opportunity for all interested persons, including those participating in the Conference, to attend workshops directed by specialists in their fields.

Please take some time to read and share the call for papers. You can also read them online and share the links.

Conference call for papers: https://www.kismifconference.com/call-conference/

Summer School call for papers: https://www.kismifconference.com/call-summer-school/

All the information here: https://www.kismifconference.com/

IASPM UK&I London Calling Conference DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 14th FEBRUARY 2020

15th IASPM UK and Ireland Biennial Conference:

London Calling

London College of Music, University of West London

3rd – 5th September 2020

In 1992, Allan Moore hosted a popular music analysis conference at the Polytechnic of West London. 28 years later the IASPM conference comes to the same building – now the University of West London. As one of the key focal points of 20th and 21st century popular music practice, London has not only projected its musical voices all over the world but has also been a hub for incoming influences that have stimulated a rich and vast array of new musical cultures. The 2020 IASPM UK & Ireland conference seeks to use this amazing heritage to provoke discussion about this and many other subjects. In addition, we are aiming to continue the recent trend for weaving popular music practice and music business and management into the IASPM tapestry. And this practice-based specialism harks back to another key figure in the academic world of music, Christopher Small, who also taught in the same building until 1986 and who coined the term musicking.

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cfp: Music Production Education Conference 2020

Music Production Education Conference 2020 – Reflecting the Future

Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK

Thursday 14th – Friday 15th May 2020

www.musicproductioneducation.co.uk

MPEC 2020 is the second conference for the study of Music Production & Technology pedagogy. MPEC seeks to provide a forum for the discussion and analysis of teaching and learning in music production & technology in Further and Higher Education. The conference offers a forum for lively debate and stimulating presentations that address some of the issues of contemporary music production education within the broader context of the arts sector, research and professional communities. 

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cfp: VII International Congress: Music and Audio-Visual Culture – MUCA.

CALL FOR PAPERS

From 28-30 May 2020, the University of Murcia (Spain) will host the Seventh International Congress: Music and Audio-Visual Culture MUCA, to provide a forum to scientific exchange with participation of composers, visual artists and researchers from several national and international universities.

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cfp: SEM 2020 panel ‘Feminist and Critical Race Approaches to Analyzing “Culture” in Music Streaming Services’

Panel Proposal for the Society for Ethnomusicology Annual Meeting

Ottawa, Canada October 22-25, 2020

Feminist and Critical Race Approaches to Analyzing the Emerging Role of ‘Culture’ in Music Streaming Services

Panel Organizer: Darci Sprengel, University of Oxford

In September 2018, Spotify launched its ‘Global Cultures Initiative’, which it insisted would make it a ‘leader’ in the field of audio streaming by moving the platform beyond its traditional focus on North American and European musics to ‘promote and advance culturally diverse music’ (Spotify Newsroom 2018). As Spotify expanded to other regions, however, it met pushback from local rivals. For example, Anghami (‘my tunes’ in Arabic), founded in Lebanon in 2012 and known as ‘the Spotify of the Middle East’, claims to meet better the needs of Arab listeners. It boasts alternative algorithmic technologies with unique abilities to combine international and local sounds in ways it asserts listeners in the Middle East and Arab diaspora want to hear, making Anghami’s distinctly local knowledge its ‘sonic brand’. These trends indicate that music streaming services differentiate themselves not through the music they provide, but through the techniques they employ to mediate between users and music catalogue (Goldschmitt and Seaver 2019).

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cfp: Music and the Spanish Civil War

Call for Papers

Music and the Spanish Civil War

8 – 10 October 2020

Humboldt University, Berlin

Convened by Diego Alonso (Postdoctoral Fellow, Humboldt University, Berlin) in collaboration with the International Hanns Eisler Society, Berlin. The conference is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

Keynote speakers:

Michael Christoforidis & Elizabeth Kertesz (U. of Melbourne, Australia)

Gemma Pérez Zalduondo (U. of Granada, Spain)

Until recently, the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939) was frequently considered a time of paralysis, a parenthesis between the rich musical life of early 20th-century Spain and the new cultural and musical landscape of post-war Spain under Franco’s dictatorship. Accordingly, we still lack a thorough account of the role played by music and music criticism in this crucial period of Spain’s recent history. Similarly, the international impact of the Civil War on music has been explored only sporadically. These studies have focused primarily on a few musicians and a small selection of works, rather than more fully examining the range of activities, productions and debates involving music in and beyond Spain.

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