cfp: [IASPM Journal] Open Call for Papers

CALL FOR PAPERS

IASPM Journal is the Open-Access journal of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM), an organization established to promote inquiry, scholarship and analysis in the area of popular music. We publish articles and book reviews that consider popular music of any genre, historical period or geographic location. In addition to Special Issue CFPs, the journal maintains a space for ongoing scholarly work. We are now accepting article submissions, with the deadline by April 1st, 2020.


As part of an international network, the journal aims to disseminate IASPM members’ research that is local, transnational, global and/or international. English is the official language, but articles may also be submitted in the official language of any of its branches (adding an English abstract). Studies may use a range of research methodologies and critical approaches, including practice as research. Our Open-Access readership is diverse and interdisciplinary and so we ask contributors to present ideas in forms accessible to sociologists, musicologists, music critics and practitioners.

In order to submit to IASPM Journal you must be an IASPM member and registered as an author on the site. See the journal site for further information regarding Submissions. Click here for a copy of the Open CFP (in several languages) and Style Guide. All articles undergo a double-blind peer review.

We look forward to receiving your submissions. 

Kind regards,

Xavier Villanueva

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Assistant Editor IASPM Journal

Sonic Scope: New Student Journal

SONIC SCOPE: NEW APPROACHES TO AUDIOVISUAL CULTURE
An e-journal for student voices to challenge, energise and diversify engagement with audiovisual media


Sonic Scope invites fresh, intrepid and dynamic student voices to re-imagine and revise critical, interdisciplinary approaches to audiovisual media. Today’s accelerated media landscape offers an unprecedented range of audiovisual experiences, from dynamically reactive video games and ultra HD sports events, to live-streamed political rallies and YouTube vlogs. Within this expanding landscape, the relationship of music and sound to image has undergone radical cultural and aesthetic upheaval. Sonic Scope intervenes in this shifting media terrain by engaging with audiovisual events as they happen. At the same time, it uses contemporary debates to revitalise discourse on traditional audiovisual forms, such as film, opera, theatre, the sounding visual arts and intermedial music.

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New issue of JPMS and other news

Hi music writers,

It’s time to end another volume year (our second with UC Press) of Journal of Popular Music Studies. Below this I’ll paste the editors’ note for issue 31:4, written by Robin James – check out her new book The Sonic Episteme: Acoustic Resonance, Neoliberalism, and Biopolitics. And as always, I encourage you to subscribe individually, using the sliding scale fees on the IASPM-US website (http://iaspm-us.net/), or to make sure your institution – if you have one — subscribes, which helps even more.

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cfp: Ethnomusicology Review Volume 22

Ethnomusicology Review is now accepting submissions for Volume 23, scheduled for publication in Fall 2021. Starting as Pacific Review of Ethnomusicology (PRE) in 1984, Ethnomusicology Review is a refereed journal managed by UCLA graduate students and a faculty advisory board. We maintain an extensive editorial board and publish interdisciplinary music research in English, Spanish, Portuguese, Indonesian, and other languages on a case-by-case basis.

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cfp: Popular Music, Decolonization and Indigenous Studies (IASPM Journal)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Special Issue: Popular Music, Decolonization and Indigenous Studies

Editors: Daniel Hernandez and Kirsten Zemke

IASPM Journal is the peer-reviewed open-access e-journal of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, IASPM. As part of an international network, the journal aims to publish research and analysis in the field of popular music studies at both global and local levels.

This Special Issue seeks to confront the Western tradition of academia, which has only been made possible through historic and ongoing processes and ideologies of colonialism. This includes the paradox that many academic scholars and institutions are housed on stolen lands. This Special Issue of IASPM Journal aims to contribute to an ongoing process of decolonization through the lens and practices of popular music by highlighting Indigenous academics, theorists and musical explorations.

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cfp: The Sound of the Past

What is the role of sound in historical fictions? How can we try to replicate what the world sounded like in the past? What is the role of music in period dramas? Why are contemporary musicals with historical settings so popular? How can sound be described in historical novels?

The Journal of Historical Fictions is looking for papers on any aspect of “sound”, broadly defined (music, mechanical sounds, songs that tell a historical narrative, voices, etc.) for a special issue on sound in historical fictions, ‘The Sound of the Past’. Please send completed articles of 6,000–8,000 words to mail@historicalfictionsjournal.org by 1 January 2020.

See our submission guidelines here:

http://historicalfictionsjournal.org/submit.html

We also have a rolling deadline for articles that relate directly to research and teaching questions on historical fictions of any kind, from all scholarly disciplines, and we welcome spontaneous submissions.

cfp: Jazz Research Journal

Call for Papers: Issues of Diversity and Inclusion in Jazz Festivals

A Special Issue of the Jazz Research Journal

Guest Editors: Emily Jones (Cheltenham Jazz Festival) and Sarah Raine (Birmingham City University, UK)

With campaigns such as Keychange (PRS Foundation, UK) bringing issues of diversity and inclusion to the fore in the music industry, professionals and researchers alike are increasingly aware of a lack of diversity in relation to jazz audiences, artists and festival staff. However, the efforts to tackle these issues lack a strong foundation of research, from either industry bodies or scholarship. Emerging out of an industry partnership project, this special issue therefore aims to provide a space for current research that engages with issues of diversity and inclusion in jazz festivals. We particularly encourage submissions that take an intersectional approach, emerge out of collaborative projects between institutions and industry, or go beyond the geographies and narratives that have come to dominate definitions of jazz.

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cfp: French Historical Studies: Music and French History/La musique et l’histoire française

Call for Papers from French Historical Studies: Music and French History/La musique et l’histoire française

The editors of French Historical Studies seek articles for a special issue on music in the Francophone world to appear in 2022.

The history of the music of France has traditionally been studied as a separate category without the same robust interest as other cultural artifacts such as film and literature. More recent scholarship illuminates the place of music in French society and suggests that more work should be done to sketch out the particular place of music in all its forms in French history.

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cfp: ZINES – An international journal on amateur and DIY media

Launch : Issue #1 – April 2020

Call for papers

ZINES is an international peer journal dedicated to studies of amateur and do-it-yourself media of any kind, from fanzines to webzines, perzines to science zines, artzines to poezines, etc.

ZINES is multi-disciplinary and opened to all scientific disciplines, from social sciences to medical sciences, art and design, media studies, etc. The first aim of the journal is to study the involvement of amateurs in the production of mediascapes, from printing form to cybermedia. It also addresses the impact of zine making for personal or collective sociabilization, especially in closed environments such as carceral or medical centres. The second aim is to examine the production of new form of communication by amateurs leading to the publication of media with a strong DIY ethos, including scholars who invent new forms of dissemination of scientific knowledge.

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