cfp: Special Issue of Journal of Global Hip Hop Studies on ‘The Fifth Element’

CfP: Special Issue of Global Hip Hop Studies Journal: 

“Knowledge Reigns Supreme”: The Fifth Element in Hip Hop Culture (2022) 

Co-edited by Justin A. Williams, Sina A. Nitzsche, and Darren Chetty 

The Journal 

Global Hip Hop Studies (GHHS) is a peer-reviewed, rigorous and community-responsive academic journal that publishes research on contemporary as well as historical issues and debates that surround hip hop music and culture around the world.  

The Special Issue 

Deejaying. Emceeing. Breaking. Graffiti. These are commonly considered hip hop’s four core elements. While hip hop contains multiple elements beyond its core, many hip hop artists, activists, and fans worldwide understand and recognize a ‘fifth element’ as knowledge. This naming practice shows us how hip hop communities understand the importance of the history, values, and artistry of the culture beyond their own temporal-spatial borders. With roots in the Universal Zulu Nation in the 1970s (Chang 2005), hip hop’s fifth element includes aims of self-realization (‘knowledge of self’), empowerment, and information about the history of the genre and its key practitioners (Gosa 2015; Alim, Haupt, Williams 2018).  

 This special issue of Global Hip Hop Studies thus addresses questions about the role of knowledge in global hip hop culture: How is it mediated across other elements, social groups, and cultural borders? How is knowledge passed on from one hip hop generation to another? What is the role of hip hop knowledge in educational institutions around the globe and how can it be used for the benefit of artists and the community? What can we as researchers, activists, and artists learn from knowledge practices in global hip hop culture?  

We invite contributions from a variety of disciplines, including musicology, pedagogy, cultural studies, ethnomusicology, visual studies, media studies, history, sociology, and other relevant fields. We are particularly keen to bring artists and scholars together to co-produce new methods for hip hop education while welcoming a wide range of perspectives and definitions around the intentionally-broad concept of hip hop’s fifth element.  

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cfp: Staging popular music

Staging popular music: sustainable music ecologies for artists, industries and cities

Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands, 3-4-5 November 2021

AIMS
This conference focuses on the intersection between key transformations in the popular music industries. Music represents and generates value on various levels from the individual to the global, and in many different spheres from the cultural and social to the economic and political. Popular music is staged through multiple platforms, actors, businesses, intermediaries and policies. The current COVID-19-crisis both challenges the music industries and acts as a catalyst of new digital innovations. This is a vital moment to (re)consider the future directions of the music industries. While the music industries are characterized by continuous change and transformation, significant disruptions have always impacted its resilience. Such disruptions can be external shocks, including the current crisis, new technologies, political change or aesthetic-cultural innovations. From an ecological perspective, all transformations force the industry to reshape and rethink itself. This will likely result in both positive as negative consequences. We need to critically reflect on what the immediate and long-term future of music ecologies entails, who benefits and who suffers from such disruptions.

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Call for Chapter Proposals on DJ Cultures in Canada

Proposed Title: We Can Dance If We Want To: Canadian DJ Culture Turns Up

Edited by Dr. Charity Marsh and Dr. Maren Hancock

“As a creative performance, the DJ set has the potential to communicate new ways of being, of feeling, producing musical discourses that are nevertheless embedded in the real-world, material, politics. In this way, DJ practices enable the immediate reconstitution of local cultural identity.” (Rietveld, 2013, 7)

The rousing success of the Art Gallery of Ontario’s “Nightclubbing” panel discussion focusing on the history of Toronto club culture is one of many recent events that illustrates a growing desire to celebrate Canadian DJ culture. Facebook and other social media sites are rife with archival material relative to DJ culture in Canada from the 1980s until the present. And although the first DJ was technically a Canadian (Reginald Fessenden gave the first radio broadcast of music and speech in 1906), Canada’s unique contributions to DJ culture are mainly absent from academic and public discourse. 

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Publication of the 9th issue of Transposition journal – Music and Sexuality

Dear colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the launch of the online peer-reviewed journal Transposition – musique et sciences sociales No. 9  “Music and Sexuality”, with contributions by Marion Brachet, Chiharu Chûjô, Aurore Flamion, Clara Wartelle-Sakamoto, Toby Young, Charlotte Vaillot Knudsen, Tia DeNora and Annegret Fauser. The issue aims to explore the seldom studied connections between music and sexuality, the relationship of sound and music to sex and desire. We also invite you to discover an interview with the argentine company Opera Queerand 23 book reviews of recent publications in musicology and social sciences. And popular music studies: https://journals.openedition.org/transposition/?lang=en

Wishing you a good read,

Esteban Buch, Violeta Nigro Giunta (eds.)

All the best,

Sarah, for the editorial team of Transposition

Progect Network 2021: Towards a Contemporary Understanding of Progressive Rock and Metal

Dear colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the conference, “Progect Network 2021: Towards a Contemporary Understanding of Progressive Rock and Metal,” to be held on May 19-20-21 and 26-27-28. 

This conference is hosted VIRTUALLY by Lori Burns at the University of Ottawa. Free registration and the full program are available at the conference website: https://progectconference2.wixsite.com/website-5

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Editors: JPMS (Journal of Popular Music Studies)

DEADLINE EXTENDED!

The Journal of Popular Music Studies (JPMS) is accepting applications for two co-editors to begin three-year terms on July 1, 2021. JPMS, published on behalf of the United States branch of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM-US), is a peer-reviewed journal dedicated to research on popular music throughout the world, approached from a variety of positions. Published four times a year, each issue features essays and reviews, as well as roundtables and creative works inspired by popular music. https://online.ucpress.edu/jpms

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Rolling call for blog posts, LGBTQ+ Music Study Group

LGBTQ+ Music Study Group

Are you a student or early career researcher with some ideas about queer musicology you would like to share? Then, we’d love to hear from you!

The LGBTQ+ Music Study Group is currently looking for new submissions for our online blog. Submissions can take the form of an essay or any other sort of creative response such as a video essay, a composition, a poem, or a piece of creative non-fiction. We want to uplift the new and exciting voices in the field of queer and trans music studies, so if you have some thoughts to share, we would love to hear them! We especially welcome submissions from BIPOC scholars and musicians and those that address issues of race, ethnicity, and intersectionality.

Submissions are carefully peer-reviewed by an editing committee. For written submissions, we suggest a 1000 word-count, but the limits are truly endless! If you are interested, please send a 200-word abstract to thomas.r.hilder@ntnu.no and we will get back to you shortly. We look forward to hearing from you!

Check out our blog here.

cfp: Music and Racism in Europe 21.-22.10.2021

Call for papers: Music and Racism in Europe

Online Symposium, 21—22 October 2021

Race is among the most significant social categories that informs and organises understandings of music. Although there is an abundance of music research that deals with BIPOC minorities and, at least implicitly, also with race, few studies explicitly address how processes of for example racialisation, essentialisation,appropriation and exclusion in music and music research can effectively be categorised as racist. However, recently there has been an increasing interest also in the issue of racism in the field of music and music scholarship and this international online symposium seeks to bring together researchers across disciplines to discussmusic and racism particularly as it relates to Europe.

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TRANS 24: Special issue on Music, Sound and Culture in Central America

Dear colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the publication of a new issue of TRANS-Revista Transcultural de Música, in this case volume 24, corresponding to the year 2020.  It includes a special dossier on “Music, Sound and Culture in Central America”, edited by Antonio Monte Casablanca (Free University of Berlin), Amanda Minks (University of Oklahoma) and Helga Zambrano (University of California – Los Angeles).

In the words of the editors, this volume “aims to integrate the Central American region into current academic knowledge and debates around the categories of music, sound and orality, particularly from the different points of view of the humanities and social sciences.” Beyond the intrinsic quality and interest of each of the articles, this collection, as a whole, reveals the rich (ethno)musicological thinking of a region that perhaps has not received due attention from music and sound studies. The publication of this special issue also responds to the Ibero-American vocation of TRANS-Revista Transcultural de Música, the flagship journal of SIBE, the Spanish Society for Ethnomusicology.  The issue is completed with the usual section of reviews.

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