Statement about use of sonic weapons in Chile

The International Association for the Study of Popular Music IASPM rejects the use of sonic weapons in the social protests in Chile. This statement was prepared by the Latin American and Spanish IASPM branches and the Spanish Society for Ethnomusicology and approved by the Executive Committee in December 19, 2019.

IASPM and their Latin American and Spanish branches, and Sibe, the Spanish Society for Ethnomusicology issue the following statement:

IASPM, IASPM-LA, and IASPM-Spain are professional associations that bring together more than a thousand specialists in the study of music and sound in society.

As professionals, we want to express our deep concern and rejection of the Chilean government’s intention to incorporate acoustic weapons to repress the social protests that have taken place in recent weeks.

Our colleagues from the Chilean Society of Musicology have exposed in detail the dangers to the health and physical integrity of the protesters and of the general population that the use of this arsenal implies (see English version here).

We want to emphasize that sound in all its forms (including music) is a fundamental factor in the construction of people’s subjectivity and the social ties that articulate our society. Its use for repressive purposes has numerous and painful antecedents that we cannot allow to be repeated and normalized.

Executive Board IASPM

IASPM-Latin America

IASPM-Spain

Sibe-Sociedad de Etnomusicología

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cfp: Music and the Spanish Civil War

Call for Papers

Music and the Spanish Civil War

8 – 10 October 2020

Humboldt University, Berlin

Convened by Diego Alonso (Postdoctoral Fellow, Humboldt University, Berlin) in collaboration with the International Hanns Eisler Society, Berlin. The conference is supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

Keynote speakers:

Michael Christoforidis & Elizabeth Kertesz (U. of Melbourne, Australia)

Gemma Pérez Zalduondo (U. of Granada, Spain)

Until recently, the Spanish Civil War (1936–1939) was frequently considered a time of paralysis, a parenthesis between the rich musical life of early 20th-century Spain and the new cultural and musical landscape of post-war Spain under Franco’s dictatorship. Accordingly, we still lack a thorough account of the role played by music and music criticism in this crucial period of Spain’s recent history. Similarly, the international impact of the Civil War on music has been explored only sporadically. These studies have focused primarily on a few musicians and a small selection of works, rather than more fully examining the range of activities, productions and debates involving music in and beyond Spain.

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cfp: IASPM Canada Annual Conference 2020 (deadline extended)

Big Sounds from Small Places

IASPM Canada Annual Conference 2020 Call For Papers

Cape Breton University: Sydney, Nova Scotia

12 – 14 June 2020

Submission Deadline10 January 2020

As we enter into a new decade it’s apt to question our place in the world. Almost sixty years ago, Marshall McLuhan notably coined the term Global Village to refer to the global spread of media content and consumption, and yet Canada still struggles with its position in the world as an imposing landmass with a relatively small population, and how that influences where and how its cultural texts are encountered. This conference seeks to address the concept of voice and sound as tied to space and place, in the broadest sense. In regards to popular music in Canada, we have established a strong identity, but one that is often defined in opposition to our more vocal neighbours to the South. As we continuously define and redefine Canadian cultural identity, and cultural outputs, this conference questions how our musical landscape has historically adapted, and will continue to adapt, to an increasingly globalized environment.

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PhD scholarship related to creative music production at the University of Huddersfield

Please note we have a PhD Scholarship in Creative Music Production just advertised at the University of Huddersfield. It is open to a range of research areas and approaches.

https://research.hud.ac.uk/research-degrees/researchscholarships/mhmscholarships/creative-music/

Call for Applications

Creative Music Production Scholarship

The Department of Music and Humanities is pleased to invite applications for the Creative Music Production Scholarship and for full and partial fee-waiver bursaries for PhD studies starting in September 2020.

The scholarship and fee-waivers are open to applicants engaged in research on any aspect of creative music production. Projects may be practice-based with a reflective commentary, analytical, theoretical or empirical. Relevant topics might include but are not limited to:

  • creative practice in the studio,
  • sonic signatures,
  • the studio as instrument,
  • genre aesthetics,
  • trends in music production and marketing,
  • performance and collaboration in the studio,
  • the business of record production,
  • professional roles in the recording industry,
  • technological changes in music production and dissemination,
  • affordances of digital music production,
  • gender equality in music production,
  • teaching music production.
  •  
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New issue of JPMS and other news

Hi music writers,

It’s time to end another volume year (our second with UC Press) of Journal of Popular Music Studies. Below this I’ll paste the editors’ note for issue 31:4, written by Robin James – check out her new book The Sonic Episteme: Acoustic Resonance, Neoliberalism, and Biopolitics. And as always, I encourage you to subscribe individually, using the sliding scale fees on the IASPM-US website (http://iaspm-us.net/), or to make sure your institution – if you have one — subscribes, which helps even more.

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Volume no. 16-1: Music & Hacking

«  MUSIC & HACKING » 

Volume ! The French Journal of Popular Music Studies,

no. 16-1, edited by Clément Canonne and Baptiste Bacot

– 198 p. — 19 €

– Table of contents: https://www.cairn.info/revue-volume-2019-2.htm

– Order the issue: https://www.lespressesdureel.com/ouvrage.php?id=7682

– Subscribe: http://www.seteun.net/spip.php?rubrique4


This issue examines some of the practices in which music and hacking meet. At first closely related to the development of American computer science research laboratories, hacking has since spread across various fields of human activity not necessarily related to information and communications technology. Hence, music provides both a theoretical and empirical space within which one can question hacking’s attributes, and delineate their aesthetic and organolologic effects, but also their integration into musicians’ discourses, or the way these musicans create musical communities and belong to them.


The interview with hacking pioneer Nicolas Collins is available in English on the site Books & Ideashttps://booksandideas.net/Hacking-Through-Contemporary-Electronic-Music.html

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30. Annual Conference of the Gesellschaft für Popularmusikforschung

Host: Popakademie Baden-Württemberg

Dates: 25. – 27. September 2020

Locations: Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst Mannheim/Popakademie Baden-Württemberg, Mannheim

in cooperation with Leuphana Universität Lüneburg as well as with the Jahrestagung des Bundesverbands Musikunterricht e.V.

Organizers: Michael Ahlers / David-Emil Wickström

Theme: Not Ready to Make Nice – Power, Threats and Harassments in Popular Music

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The 7th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies (IAPMS) Conference Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia (deadline extended)

*** Dec 15, 2019: The deadline for the submission is extended to Jan 15, 2020. 

The 7th Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies (IAPMS) Conference Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

23-25 July, 2020

Organised by Inter-Asia Popular Music Studies Group (IAPMS Group)

Hosted by

Sunway University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Abstract Submissions Deadline

15 December 2019

Theme: Asia’s Sonic (under)Currents and Currencies

The recent international popularity of Korean pop groups BTS and Blackpink placed Asia from passive recipients to active participants of otherwise US and UK dominated global pop music. However, the extent in which they represent and personify the rich undercurrent of popular music circulation in Asia remains debatable in Asia’s culturally diverse landscapes. While the digital platform and social media as well as travel have intensified the flows of popular music participation, it is probably premature to idealistically suggest the levelling of more enduring historical and cultural boundaries and borders. The post•global or post•digital condition needs discussion.

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Deadline postponed, information on program / CFP IASPM-Norden conference 2020: Music in the Age of Streaming – Nordic Perspectives, Piteå, Sweden, 15–17 June 2020

IASPM-Norden conference 2020

Music in the Age of Streaming – Nordic Perspectives

IASPM-NORDEN CONFERENCE

PITEÅ, SWEDEN, 15–17 JUNE 2020

The IASPM-Norden conference aims to shed light on various aspects of streaming of/in popular music within the Nordic context. Nordic popular music is a dynamic field comprising a great variety of artists, music producers and entrepreneurs on both ends of the cultural spectrum, from commercially successful to less known and underground. More broadly, listening to popular music has become an evermore accessible activity in people’s everyday life, and so have the “streams” of music flowing across many borders – geographical, ideological, socioeconomic, cultural, disciplinary, etc. In addition to the everyday distribution and listening of music through digital networks, we contend specifically that “streaming” may also be used to conceptualize musical cultures beyond the scope of Spotify or other streaming services. That said, even an analysis of a platform like Spotify may benefit from an approach that investigates the deeper currents and flows of its streams, as pursued by Spotify Teardown (Eriksson et al. 2019) recently. With this conference we wish to engage with the many intersections of musical streams and invite papers that highlight the ways in which “streaming” characterize music and musical cultures.

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