cfp: Groove the City

Call for Papers:
Groove the City 2020 –
Constructing and Deconstructing Urban Spaces through Music conference
Feb. 13th to 15th 2020 at the Leuphana University of Lüneburg, Germany.

We are looking for papers that transgress the boundaries between our notions of music and space. We are explicitly following Henri Lefèbvre’s (1991) concept of a dialectics of triplicity and Edward Soja’s (2008) trialectic of spatiality. A first level encompasses material, physical, and social spaces of music and the mutuality of sound–music and space–architecture from historical, social, economic and cultural perspectives. A second level focusses on the mutuality of music and symbolic aspects of space such as images, brands, and imaginaries. While the third level should open up an
arena of powerful mediations between music–sound and spatial politics, whether this results in the appropriation of the city by music or the appropriation of music by the city.
Continue reading

Jazz On the Telly

JAZZ ON THE TELLY
A one-day conference
Birmingham City University, City Centre Campus (B4 7BD)
Saturday 12 October 2019, 10.00-16.00

Birmingham City University is pleased to announce Jazz on the Telly, a conference to be held on 12 October 2019. This event will mark the conclusion of the AHRC-funded project, Jazz on BBC-TV 1960-1969, part of an ECR Research Leadership Fellowship awarded to Dr Nicolas Pillai The day will include: a reflection on the achievement and challenges of the project from Pillai, an industry panel on the future of jazz television, a strategy meeting for delegates on the formation of a Jazz and Media network and the launch of two publications: the first academic special issue on the subject of jazz television (Jazz Research Journal 12: 1) and a report entitled Reconstructing Television History: the case of Jazz 625.
The intention of the conference is to gather academics, musicians and industry professionals working on jazz television and television history more generally so that we may share current work and create collaborative opportunities for the future.
Delegates will be invited to deliver a 10-min presentation (including clips) detailing their current work. The conference will be free to attend and refreshments will be provided throughout the day.

Please book your ticket here.

cfp: BFE2020 Annual Conference

Call for Papers

British Forum for Ethnomusicology Annual Conference 2020
16-19 April 2020
Bath Spa University, Newton Park, Bath, UK

Keynote speaker: Dr Angela Impey (SOAS, University of London)

As with all BFE Annual Conferences we welcome papers and panels on any aspect of current ethnomusicological research.

The 2020 theme will be Music, Culture and Nature.
Continue reading

CFP: 2nd IASPM-SEA Conference 2020

CFP: 2nd IASPM-SEA Conference 2020

Date
31 January – 2 February, 2020

Host
Ateneo de Manila University
Katipunan Ave, Quezon City, 1108 Metro Manila, Philippines

Organizer
International Association for the Study of Popular Music – Southeast Asia Branch (IASPM-SEA)

Theme
Within, Across and Beyond Borders: Southeast Asian Popular Music Studies

Continue reading

New publication on jazz research: Jazzforschung heute (open-access)

Dear all,

we’re happy to announce the release of our proceedings on jazz
research in the German-speaking area, “Jazzforschung heute. Themen,
Methoden, Perspektiven”. Articles are partly in German- and
English-language and accessible as open-access:
Single articles: https://jazzforschung.hfm-weimar.de/publikationen/
full-text PDF: https://e-pub.uni-weimar.de/opus4/frontdoor/index/index/docId/3868

Martin Pfleiderer & Wolf-Georg Zaddach University of Music Franz
Liszt Weimar/Germany

Songwriting, Streaming, and Sustainability

Dear IASPMites,

Registration is now open for the second Songwriting Studies Research Network event taking place in London on Aug 8th in partnership with The Ivors Academy and the Meltdown Festival.

This time around our morning and afternoon sessions will feature discussions between professional practitioners, industry experts, and leading academics over at The Ivors Academy, followed by a live Sodajerker podcast with special guests Nile Rodgers and Merck Mercuriadis as part of Meltdown at the Southbank.

Go here to find out about the event and to book your free tickets: https://songwritingstudies.com/events.

Look forward to seeing you there!
Simon Barber, Mike Jones, and the Songwriting Studies team

Canberra conference welcome statement

This was the IASPM 2019 Canberra conference welcome statement by Franco Fabbri, the chair of 2017-2019 EC. We thought it should be shared for the whole IASPM community, as it looks back to the history of the association:

Welcome

It is my turn now to say “Welcome to the Twentieth International Conference on Popular Music Studies”. The title of the first one, held at Amsterdam University in 1981, was slightly different: International Conference on Popular Music Research. It was organised by a Dutch radio programmer, the late Gerard Kempers, by a British librarian and blues scholar, David Horn, and by a British musicologist then teaching in Sweden, Philip Tagg. At the end of that conference, those three pioneers and a few other musicologists, sociologists and music professionals proposed to establish an “International Association for the Study of Popular Music”. The acronym was awkward, but nobody at that time would pronounce it differently from “Iaspm”.

Many things have changed, from the first decade. Some for worse. Article 2.1 of the Statutes said (says) that “The aim of the Association is to provide an international, interdisciplinary and interprofessional organization for promoting the study of popular music”, and among the founders one could find a radio programmer and a professional musician; in the 1980s there were rumours that Peter Gabriel had become a member, and Rock in Opposition founder Chris Cutler was certainly one; if, at that time, one had mentioned Georgina Born, it would probably be because that former member of the avant-rock band Henry Cow and of the Feminist Improvising Group was doing research at the Ircam in Paris; and one thing that the non-African Iaspm members – about twenty – attending the Accra conference in 1987 will never forget was the ceremony held one night in a shantytown near Ghana’s capital city, when several hundreds of people paid homage to the best known local rapper, died just few days before, and the European, North American, Australian and Asian music scholars (there was a very adventurous Japanese, Shuhei Hosokawa, among them, and the Aussie was Marcus Breen) were the only people invited who weren’t part of that African community.

Now Iaspm (for some, Aiaspm) is seen basically as an academic association. As one of the founders once commented, in the first years nobody would have ever foreseen that at some point being a Iaspm officer, even at national level, could become an important qualification for obtaining an academic position, in some countries. On the other hand, Iaspm has grown considerably: it has more than thirteen hundred members all around the world and sixteen active national or regional branches. And it has given impulse, directly or indirectly to a large number of journals, book series, publications. Popular music studies are important in today’s academic world, and other musicological societies are, at least, concerned. For those who for a century (since Guido Adler) had been defining the canon of which music deserves to be studied, and which not, things have dangerously changed; and the good relationships existing between Iaspm and the International Council for Traditional Music, at international or local level, must not make us forget that until the beginning of this century popular music had been the hic sunt leones of ethnomusicology, the region a serious scholar should avoid carefully.

The task of keeping Iaspm alive and growing is not easy, but there are reasons for optimism: we are going to have a great conference here in Canberra, and I am pleased, as Chair, to congratulate the Local Organising Committee and to thank our host, the Australian National University, and the other institutions which gave their support. And we have already excellent proposals for the next conference, which will be discussed at the General Meeting to be held on Thursday morning, at 8:00 am. I warmly invite all conference participants to attend that meeting, which is the main governing body of our association, along with the Executive Committee.

Thank you very much.

Franco Fabbri