cfp: Transformational POP. 4th IASPM D-A-CH Conference, 22-24 October, Paderborn

call for papers

Transformational POP

Transitions, Breaks, and Crises in Popular Music (Studies)

4th Biennial IASPM D-A-CH Conference, 22–24 October 2020

Paderborn University/Germany, Faculty of Humanities and Arts, Department of Music – Popular Music and Media

Organizational Committee: IASPM D-A-CH Executive Committee and Advisory Board +  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Beate Flath, Prof. Dr. Christoph Jacke, Manuel Troike (Local hosts)

Pop music cultures, in their entire breadth, are seismographs of social, political, economic, ecological, media, artistic, and technological transformations. In and through them, fields of tensions, disruptions, and lines of conflict become not only visible, audible and perceptible, but also communicable and thus, negotiable. Economic and ecological crises, social structural changes, political shifts, communicative-media discourses, atmospheric moods, and disturbances of the most diverse kind cannot be appreciated in isolation from specific sounds, performances, lyrics, images, stars, genres, etc. Therefore, these are always changing in the process: pop music cultures transform and are themselves transformed. “Pop is transformational, always. It is a dynamic movement in which cultural materials and its social environments mutually reshape each other, crossing previously fixed boundaries: class boundaries, ethnic boundaries or cultural boundaries [own translation].“ (Diedrich Diederichsen, Pop – deskriptiv, normativ, emphatisch (1996). In: Charis Goer, Stefan Greif, Christoph Jacke (Eds.): Texte zur Theorie des Pop, 2013: 188)

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REGISTRATION Media Industries 2020: Global Currents and Contradictions, 16-18 April 2020 King’s College London

Media Industries 2020: Global Currents and Contradictions

16-18 April 2020

King’s College London

Registration is now open to NON-SPEAKERS.

Visit https://media-industries.org/ for details of the conference, delegate fees, venue, travel, accommodation and accessibility.

Important: Tickets are limited and will be available until all are sold or until 18.00hrs GMT on Friday 13 March, whichever is soonest.

Delegate Rates

For full registration details, visit https://media-industries.org/registration

Rates are divided between Full (academics, waged) and Reduced (students, unwaged), and  graduated according to the three tiers of the World Bank’s classification of countries by per capita income levels. As a delegate, you pay the rate according to the country you live in and not the country from which you originate. Delegates who are residents of countries in tier B pay 75% of the tier A price, and residents of tier C countries pay 50% of the tier A price.

1st Queer Forum of the LGBTQ+ Music Study Group

https://www.lgbtqmusicstudygroup.com/

Friday 3rd April 2020, University of York

Invitation to Participate

The LGBTQ+ Music Study Group hereby launches a new biennial initiative: “Queer Forum”. This day-long event aims to catalyse new ways of thinking, being and doing music scholarship in and beyond the academy. As José Esteban Muñoz writes, “[w]e may never touch queerness, but we can feel it as the warm illumination of a horizon imbued with potentiality” (2009, 1). Inspired by queer and feminist theorists – especially bell hooks and Sara Ahmed – who are dissatisfied with the present, who wrestle with existing institutional structures, and who propose new modes of scholarship and education, we entice you to join us in radical academic experimentation in search for new horizons and potentialities.

The 2020 forum urges participants to recover queer pasts and imagine new queer futures. How do we create opportunity, time and space in the academy beyond the logics of capitalism to allow us to muse about music? What are the possibilities for forging strong/vulnerable subjectivities and caring solidarities within and beyond existing academic hierarchies? What freedoms can we gift ourselves to allow for experimentation in our musical writing, teaching and performing? How do we nurture and share intersectional wisdoms in ways that centre the health, well-being and vitality of ourselves and others?

The day will include no formal presentations; rather, it will be structured around a range of different creative, intellectual and social activities – workshops, reading groups, group work, interventions – that tempt us to try out new conceptualisations and embodiments of queer music scholarship. The day will begin at 9am and end at 5pm. Participants are welcome to join us for a dinner the evening before (Thursday 2nd April, 7pm).

We welcome musicians and scholars within music studies (including ethnomusicology, historical musicology, performance studies, popular music studies, theory and analysis, etc.) and beyond. The event is free to attend and we will offer refreshments during the day. Dinner and accommodation will be at participants’ own expenses. Information about accommodation will be sent out following event registration. Please register your participation on Eventbrite by 1st March 2020https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/1st-queer-forum-of-the-lgbtq-music-study-group-tickets-92339677461

The event is organised by Marie Bennett, Rachel Cowgill, Thomas Hilder and Danielle Sofer. We are grateful to the University of York and the RMA for supporting this event. For any queries, please email: lgbtqmusicsg@gmail.com

cfp: Transcultural Hip-Hop

CALL FOR PAPERS

Transcultural Hip-Hop: Constructing and Contesting Identity, Space, and Place in the Americas and beyond

University of Bern, Switzerland, October 30 – 31, 2020

Almost fifty years after its birth, hip-hop is considered a truly global phenomenon that combines elements of uniformity with local symbols and expressions regarding musical forms, lyrics, performances, and social content. It can be said that within the US context, hip-hop emerged during the 1970s as an African American subculture. However, from its very beginning hip-hop has been a highly transcultural and hybrid phenomenon that integrates various musical elements and forms of cultural expression. In addition to African American popular culture, for example, Caribbean and Latin American music styles, language and dance played a vital role in the formation and development of hip-hop on both coasts of the US. The entanglement of diverse cultures and diasporas on the evolution of hip-hop as a music and as a movement, in the urban settings of New York and Los Angeles, for example, encourages us to think of these different musical, cultural, and social traits in more fluid or hybrid terms. 

Furthermore, diasporic identity in the multicultural neighborhoods where hip-hop first emerged is also fluid concerning the interaction between diasporic “peripheries” and their centers of origin. This conference aims to focus on the transcultural, inter-ethnic and diasporic exchanges that created hip-hop and helped to spread it within the US and beyond. The conference asks how identity markers bound by ethnic, cultural, and spatial categories are being negotiated in hip-hop. While concentrating on the Americas, the conference will also include papers that focus on other world regions and on transregional entanglements.

Within the framework of transculturality, the organizers wish to focus on three principal areas of enquiry:

A. Identity Politics in Hip-Hop

In the context of US hip-hop, many scholars argue that hip-hop should be understood with regard to its African American “centrality” (Ogbar 2007; Perry 2004). While this is not disputed by the conference organizers per se, we ask how can we better understand the hybridity of hip-hop music and culture, both at its point of origin, and as a global phenomenon? Furthermore, how do other minority groups and diasporas draw upon ´African American´ cultural markers to legitimate their contributions to the genre? How do local and global hip-hop movements reproduce and adapt such identity markers to different social and political contexts and agendas? In doing so, notions of identity and authenticity are contested and broadened over time.

B. Movement, Reproduction and Hybridity of Cultural Signifiers in Hip-Hop

Following on from these themes and borrowing from Appadurai’s (1996) understanding of cultural flows or ‘scapes’ in an era of globalization, one way of understanding the myriad creations of hybrid identity constructions in hip-hop is to identify and unpack the reproduction and merging of cultural signifiers, be they musical, visual, linguistic or otherwise. Which cultural symbols are (re-)produced in a particular context, and how do local or national cultural forms interact with transnational and global cultural flows? How does cultural politics shape the negotiation of cultural signifiers? Finally, for minority groups establishing themselves in different diasporic contexts, what is their relationship with their home or national culture from afar, and how do they shape the transcultural dynamics of centers of hip-hop production?

C. Space & Place in Hip-Hop

Like no other musical genre, hip-hop reflects a unique importance of space and identity(Rose 1994; Forman 2002). From its very inception in New York City, representing one’s neighborhood at battles was a central part of hip-hop culture. When Los Angeles became the center of gangster rap in the late 1980s, African American and Latino rap artists highlighted the intermingling of hip-hop with gang culture on the West Coast. The East Coast/West Coast feud in the mid-1990s, culminating in the deaths of Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls, pointed to the collision of geographical and musical spaces when negotiating spatial identities and affiliations. Thus, in its myriad forms and expressions in the US and around the globe, hip-hop’s “powerful ties to place” (Forman 2002) are omnipresent and reflected by artist names, languages and local slang as well as references to specific geographical markers and signature musical styles of a particular locality. How are common issues of marginalization and contested localities being negotiated in hiphop? What can these place-identities tell us about the political, socio-geographic and cultural context hip-hop culture is produced in?

The conference will be held in English and prospective participants should please send a title and abstract of up to 300 words to keith.cann@hist.unibe.ch by March 15, 2020.

Travel and accommodation costs will be covered thanks to funding from the Swiss National Science Foundation.

cfp: KISMIF Conference in Porto 2020 + Summer School 2020

We are organizing the fifth KISMIF Conference, happening in Porto, 8-11 July 2020. The conference will take place in The Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the University of Porto, Casa da Música and Rivoli Municipal Theatre of Porto, among others, for four days of multidisciplinary presentations and discussions about “DIY Cultures and Global Challenges”.

On July 7th Rivoli Municipal Theatre of Porto will also host the Summer School ‘Not Just Holidays in the Sun’ which will offer an opportunity for all interested persons, including those participating in the Conference, to attend workshops directed by specialists in their fields.

Please take some time to read and share the call for papers. You can also read them online and share the links.

Conference call for papers: https://www.kismifconference.com/call-conference/

Summer School call for papers: https://www.kismifconference.com/call-summer-school/

All the information here: https://www.kismifconference.com/

Conference announcement: Mediating Music, April 17-18, Indiana University

Conference announcement: Mediating Music

Indiana University, Bloomington

April 17-18, 2020

The Platform Global Popular Music Team at Indiana University (Kyle Adams, director) is pleased to announce our Symposium, “Mediating Music,” to be held on the campus of Indiana University, Bloomington, April 17-18. Opening and closing keynote addresses will be given by Brian Eno (participating live by video stream) and Maureen Mahon (New York University).

Other lectures and performances will be given by:

  • Jace Clayton (DJ Rupture), musician, artist, and author of Uproot: Travels in 21st Century Music and Digital Culture
  • Damon Krukowski, drummer (Galaxie 500, Damon & Naomi) and author of Ways of Hearing and The New Analog
  • G YAMAZAWA, hip-hop artist, National Poetry Slam winner, cultural diplomat for the U.S. Department of State
  • Fredara Hadley, Professor of Ethnomusicology, The Juilliard School
  • Regina Bradley, Assistant Professor of English and African Diaspora Studies, Kennesaw State University
  • Shane Greene, Professor of Anthropology, Indiana University, and Olga Rodríguez-Ulloa, Assistant Professor of Spanish, Lafayette University

The event will also include talks by Indiana University graduate students Allison Martin, Jinny Park, and Zachary Zinser, as well as undergraduates Mark Foster, Jacob Jahiel, and Stuart Sones.

All talks on Saturday, April 18 will take place in The Big Tent, a circular array of projection screens and speakers designed to give participants a 360-degree audiovisual experience.

The symposium is free but ticketed. The website and registration link will be available shortly. For questions, please contact Kyle Adams (kyadams@indiana.edu) or Erin Kelley (eekelley@iu.edu), program manager. Further description follows:

The question of music’s place in a multiply-mediated world is inescapable today, whether we are talking about artistic or technological media. Focusing on “global popular music”—a rubric we interpret broadly—“Mediating Music” asks about music’s role in mediating extra-musical content—political resistance, for example, or stories told in words or images—and how music is mediated by other means—through video, through words, through devices and technologies. We are as interested in multi-media sound practices as in film documentaries on music, writing about music, or how music functions as a “soundtrack” for daily life. “Mediating Music” is the capstone event for 18 months collaborative research by a research team at Platform: a Research Laboratory in the Arts and Humanities. Platform is a multi-year research project generously funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Office of the Provost at Indiana University.  

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We hope to see you there!

Sincerely,

Kyle Adams

Associate Professor of Music Theory

Chair, Department of Music Theory

Jacobs School of Music

Indiana University

IASPM UK&I London Calling Conference DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 14th FEBRUARY 2020

15th IASPM UK and Ireland Biennial Conference:

London Calling

London College of Music, University of West London

3rd – 5th September 2020

In 1992, Allan Moore hosted a popular music analysis conference at the Polytechnic of West London. 28 years later the IASPM conference comes to the same building – now the University of West London. As one of the key focal points of 20th and 21st century popular music practice, London has not only projected its musical voices all over the world but has also been a hub for incoming influences that have stimulated a rich and vast array of new musical cultures. The 2020 IASPM UK & Ireland conference seeks to use this amazing heritage to provoke discussion about this and many other subjects. In addition, we are aiming to continue the recent trend for weaving popular music practice and music business and management into the IASPM tapestry. And this practice-based specialism harks back to another key figure in the academic world of music, Christopher Small, who also taught in the same building until 1986 and who coined the term musicking.

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cfp: Music Production Education Conference 2020

Music Production Education Conference 2020 – Reflecting the Future

Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK

Thursday 14th – Friday 15th May 2020

www.musicproductioneducation.co.uk

MPEC 2020 is the second conference for the study of Music Production & Technology pedagogy. MPEC seeks to provide a forum for the discussion and analysis of teaching and learning in music production & technology in Further and Higher Education. The conference offers a forum for lively debate and stimulating presentations that address some of the issues of contemporary music production education within the broader context of the arts sector, research and professional communities. 

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cfp: VII International Congress: Music and Audio-Visual Culture – MUCA.

CALL FOR PAPERS

From 28-30 May 2020, the University of Murcia (Spain) will host the Seventh International Congress: Music and Audio-Visual Culture MUCA, to provide a forum to scientific exchange with participation of composers, visual artists and researchers from several national and international universities.

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