cfp: BFE2020 Annual Conference

Call for Papers

British Forum for Ethnomusicology Annual Conference 2020
16-19 April 2020
Bath Spa University, Newton Park, Bath, UK

Keynote speaker: Dr Angela Impey (SOAS, University of London)

As with all BFE Annual Conferences we welcome papers and panels on any aspect of current ethnomusicological research.

The 2020 theme will be Music, Culture and Nature.
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CFP: 2nd IASPM-SEA Conference 2020

CFP: 2nd IASPM-SEA Conference 2020

Date
31 January – 2 February, 2020

Host
Ateneo de Manila University
Katipunan Ave, Quezon City, 1108 Metro Manila, Philippines

Organizer
International Association for the Study of Popular Music – Southeast Asia Branch (IASPM-SEA)

Theme
Within, Across and Beyond Borders: Southeast Asian Popular Music Studies

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New publication on jazz research: Jazzforschung heute (open-access)

Dear all,

we’re happy to announce the release of our proceedings on jazz
research in the German-speaking area, “Jazzforschung heute. Themen,
Methoden, Perspektiven”. Articles are partly in German- and
English-language and accessible as open-access:
Single articles: https://jazzforschung.hfm-weimar.de/publikationen/
full-text PDF: https://e-pub.uni-weimar.de/opus4/frontdoor/index/index/docId/3868

Martin Pfleiderer & Wolf-Georg Zaddach University of Music Franz
Liszt Weimar/Germany

Songwriting, Streaming, and Sustainability

Dear IASPMites,

Registration is now open for the second Songwriting Studies Research Network event taking place in London on Aug 8th in partnership with The Ivors Academy and the Meltdown Festival.

This time around our morning and afternoon sessions will feature discussions between professional practitioners, industry experts, and leading academics over at The Ivors Academy, followed by a live Sodajerker podcast with special guests Nile Rodgers and Merck Mercuriadis as part of Meltdown at the Southbank.

Go here to find out about the event and to book your free tickets: https://songwritingstudies.com/events.

Look forward to seeing you there!
Simon Barber, Mike Jones, and the Songwriting Studies team

cfp: Documenting Jazz 2020

DOCUMENTING JAZZ 2020

‘We never look at just one thing; we are always looking at the relation between things and ourselves. Our vision is continually active, continually moving, continually holding things in a circle around itself, constituting what is present to us as we are’, John Berger, (ed.) Ways of Seeing. 1987.

Birmingham City University is pleased to announce the Call for Papers for the Documenting Jazz conference, to be held on 16–18 January 2020. Now in its second year, Documenting Jazz brings together colleagues from across the academic, archive, library, and museum sectors to explore and discuss documenting jazz. Since its first edition in Dublin 2019, the Documenting Jazz Conference aims to offer an unparalleled variety of experiences drawn from across the world. We hope to include contributions from individuals of all career stages, from established scholars and practitioners to those just starting their careers. We embrace the academic sector and other heritage and cultural organisations in partnership with each other and with communities. Our keynote speakers are drawn from across the academic sector to inspire debate and discussion amongst participants.
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cfp: The Road to Independence: the Independent Record Industry in Transition (extended deadline)

Deadline extended to 1 September 2019

Call for Chapters: The Road to Independence: the Independent Record Industry in Transition.

Call for chapters
The Road to Independence: the Independent Record Industry in Transition.
Editor : Victor Sarafian.
Publisher : Presse de l’Université Toulouse 1 Capitole

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cfp: Progressive Rock and Metal: Towards a Contemporary Understanding

Français ci-dessous

Call for Papers
Progressive Rock and Metal: Towards a Contemporary Understanding
The 4th Biennial International Conference of the Progect Network for the Study of Progressive Rock

Hosted by Lori Burns at the University of Ottawa, May 20-22, 2020 (Ottawa, Canada)

CFP Deadline: September 15, 2019

Progressive Rock and Metal: Towards a Contemporary Understanding aims to explore the past and present contexts of the genres of progressive rock and metal. With its origins in the psychedelic counterculture and freeform rock radio (a format featuring long-playing records) in the late 1960s, progressive rock of the 1970s was characterized by formal complexity, dynamic variety, instrumental experimentation, and the influence of classical and jazz music. While progressive rock flourished in the 1970s with bands such as Pink Floyd, Genesis, and Rush, the 1980s and 1990s saw the rise of progressive metal as a major development within the metal scene. Bands such as Dream Theater, Tool, and Meshuggah presented a new style of metal that embraced many of the values of progressive rock (e.g. harmonic, rhythmic, and formal complexity, instrumental virtuosity, and concept-driven albums) and ventured into new and innovative musical territories such as dense chromaticism and polyrhythmic structures. Since 2000, progressive metal has thrived with artists such as Pain of Salvation, Symphony X, and Devin Townsend. At the same time, metal bands such as Opeth, The Gathering, and Anathema have shifted away from metal subgenres towards progressive rock. Artists such as Porcupine Tree, Riverside, and The Pineapple Thief have reprised 70s progressive rock aesthetics while also exploring progressive metal and alternative rock stylings. Progressive bands have also explored genre intersections, resulting in a diversity of styles and crossovers. For instance, the progressive aesthetics of the 1970s have been revitalized in “new-prog,” a genre which blends contemporary punk stylings with progressive rock, as exemplified by bands such as The Mars Volta, Coheed & Cambria, and Circa Survive. The progressive bands of the new millennium are thus influenced by a range of genres, including progressive rock and metal, post-hardcore, electronica, industrial, alternative rock, jazz-rock, experimental rock, and post-rock. The genre fusions and stylistic eclecticism of the past twenty years have led to a profusion of progressive rock and metal styles, and progressive features have surfaced in other music genres such as alternative rock and indie rock, as exemplified by bands such as American Football, Minus the Bear, and The Dear Hunter. With this musical corpus, artists engage with a range of musical and worldbuilding strategies. In the 70s, progressive rock advanced the concept album and intermedia forms with works such as Genesis’s The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway Tour (1974) or Pink Floyd’s The Wall (1979). Contemporary progressive bands have continued and furthered the transmedia aspects of musical expression through elaborate concept-based recordings, music videos, films, print materials, and other media forms (e.g. Steven Wilson’s Hand Cannot Erase (2015) or Coheed and Cambria’s Amory Wars series (2002-present)). Much scholarly work is needed to explore the musical expression, structural elements, production values, worldbuilding strategies, critical and fan reception, and other discursive aspects of the genre.
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