Call for applications: Electronic Music Journalism

Berlin-based electronic music magazine GROOVE is teaming up with Goethe-Institute for a digital workshop programme on international electronic music journalism organized by Kristoffer Cornils and Laura Aha. We are inviting young journalists from all over the world and specifically from the so-called Global South to apply for the programme with the aim of developing a written, in-depth feature on their respective local scene. Applications are now open until August 3rd. 

The two-week seminar block will take place online from the 17th to the 28th of August and is open for the general public. Once the seminars are concluded, the ten selected participants will take action on their own: in coordination with the editors of GROOVE, they will write an article focusing on the regional specifics of electronic music in their own countries, in their native language and with a respective English translation. Besides the opportunity of having their piece published in both languages by GROOVE in November this year, the participation in the workshop programme and the article will be compensated by the Goethe-Institut with a one-time payment of € 500 per participant.

Find the whole announcement here:

https://groove.de/2020/06/29/global-groove-electronic-music-journalism/

Call for Chapters: The Best Side of Capitalism? The Life, Death, and Afterlife of the Record Store

This book explores, from a variety of perspectives and methodologies, how record stores became such important locales. As an agora, a community center, and a busy critical forum for taste, culture, and politics, the record store prefigured social media. Once conduits to new music, frequently bypassing the corporate music industry in ways now done more easily via the Internet, independent record stores (in direct opposition to rock radio programmed by corporate interests), championed the most local of economic enterprises, allowing social mobility to well up from them in unexpected ways. In this way, record stores speak volumes about our relationship to shopping, capitalism, and art. The editors of this volume believe that record stores are spaces rife for examination because their cultural history is in some ways the story of the best side of capitalism seen in microcosm. To that end, this book employs three motifs: cultural history, urban geography, and auto-ethnography to find out what individual record stores meant to individual people, but also what they meant to communities, to musical genres, and to society in general. What was their role in shaping social practices, aesthetic tastes, and even, loosely put, ideologies? This book will collect stories and memories, and facts about a variety of local stores that will not only re-center the record store as a marketplace of ideas, but also explore and celebrate a neglected personal history of many lives.

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Call for Chapters – “Melodies and Maladies: Musical Responses to Plagues and Pandemics”

Editors Dr. Brent Keogh and Prof. Phil Hayward

Equinox Publishing

Chapter proposals are invited for a collected edition on the theme of musical responses to plagues and pandemics. This book will chart a historical trajectory of musical responses to plagues and pandemics, providing a critical historical perspective on the lived experiences in the present. By focusing on major plagues, outbreaks, and pandemics, such as the Black Death, the Spanish flu, SARS, and Zika virus, we aim to historically contextualise musical responses to such disasters. In addition to charting historical contexts, this collection will address ways in which musicians have harnessed digital technologies to create forms of patronage, connect with fans, rehearse with band members, and network with peers and industry. The volume will also discuss musical responses in terms of the intersections of class and race, where social distancing is virtually impossible for some classes of people due to their specific living conditions, or where the prevailing Government policy is to “let it rip”, to allow a virus to sweep through the population for reasons of “herd immunity”, economic stability, or an under-resourced medical system. This edition will provide a timely work that not only accounts for the exceptional times we are living in, but sheds light on this time by thinking historically through musical responses to plagues and pandemics and suggesting manners in which future ones may be navigated by cultural producers and audiences.

Proposals due 31 July 2020

Chapter submissions of 4,500-7,000 words due 25 January 2021

Contact: brent.keogh@uts.edu.auphilip.hayward@uts.edu.au

The Future of Live Music; Round Table Discussion and Book Launch Event

2pm Thursday 11 June, Youtube Live @ shorturl.at/cwFMT

Thursday 11 June will see people from the music industry and academics from around the world, come together online to explore the question ‘What is the Future of Live Music?’.  Clearly a hugely topical subject, particularly since the abrupt halt on public gatherings last March due to Covid-19. 

The online event will start at 2pm on Youtube live, and include seminal musicians Peter Hook of Joy Division and New Order fame and 808 State co-founder Graham Massey, Liam Ogburn from the hotly tipped band ‘Working Mens Club’, leading venue and festival operator Aaron Mellor, Teresa Moore from a Greener Festival to be chaired by Tony Rigg.  

The occasion marks the launch of a new book called ‘The Future of Live Music’ published by Bloomsbury, co-edited by UCLan’s Tony Rigg, Ewa Mazierska and Les Gillon.  The book explores many of the dimensions of live music and features an international cast of contributions who will be discussing their chapters at the event.

cfp: XXI Biennial IASPM Conference in Daegu, South Korea

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“Climates of Popular Music”, 21st Biennial Conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music

See also the conference website for more details http://www.iaspm2021.org

Call for Presentations

The most pressing issue for humanity in the 21st century is global climate, and thus IASPM’s 21st Conference turns its attention towards this subject. Whereas our 20th anniversary conference considered where we have been, we now ask where we are now, what we are doing as a species, and what impact it has on our communities and our world. On a planet increasingly interconnected by a dizzying array of media channels, such a discussion has to be broadly framed. Our planet’s climate is impacted by numerous forms of human activity, including those that are individual, personal, local, communal, institutional, commercial, corporate, cultural, political, and international. This conference invites presentations that ask how popular music relates to our climate, where climate relates to any part of the totality of surrounding conditions and circumstances affecting growth or development. By “climate,” we intend to include a range of definitions, including ecological climate, political climates, socio-political climates, and contextual and individuated climates. We ask presenters to consider the impacts of activities related to popular music and its cultures on variously defined climates, and the impacts of changing or changed climates on different popular music and its contexts. 

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Fred Rogers Music Fellow

The Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children’s Media at Saint Vincent College has a new fellowship.

Fred Rogers had a deep passion for music and composed many of the songs on his television program, Mister Rogers Neighborhood. In honor of Fred Rogers’ love of music, The Gretsch family (of Gretsch Guitars) has endowed a new music fellowship at the Fred Rogers Center. The Gretsch Fellow in Children’s Music will conduct research and develop scholarly work around the ethos and vision of the Fred Rogers Center and its mission “to help children grow as confident, competent, and caring human beings.” You can find more information here: https://www.fredrogerscenter.org/what-we-do/music-fellowship. We are seeking a musician with notable credentials in scholarship, education, or a related background

Masters scholarship for BAME students at Goldsmiths

Goldsmiths Department of Music offers a MA/MMus scholarship for BAME students.

There is a dramatic under-representation of black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) music scholars at the academic professional level. The same is true throughout British academia. This full tuition fee-waiver scholarship aims to support a BAME student who intends to progress through postgraduate study and into an academic research position.

The deadline for applying for this scholarship is 9am, 13 July 2020.

Full details: https://www.gold.ac.uk/pg/fees-funding/departmental-awards/music/

Call for Think Pieces: Working in Music and the Covis-19 Pandemic

Since the Covid-19 outbreak was announced as a pandemic by the World Health Organization in March 2020, most countries announced lockdown or semi-confinement measures almost immediately, with all public events being cancelled. This had an immediate and direct effect on artists all over the world whose livelihood is heavily dependent on public performances. 

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cfp: Born to Be Alive: Live Music as a Crucial Dimension of 21st Century Popular Music – Special Issue

Call for Papers: Born to Be Alive: Live Music as a Crucial Dimension of 21st Century Popular Music – Special Issue | Ethnomusicology Review

https://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/content/call-papers-born-be-alive-live-music-crucial-dimension-21st-century-popular-music-special

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cfp (articles): Sound Stage Screen (Vol. 1, Spring 2021)

We are pleased to announce the launch of Sound Stage Screen (SSS), a new biannual peer-reviewed journal devoted to historical and theoretical research into the relations between sound, performance, and media. SSS will address a wide range of phenomena, practices, and objects pertaining to sound and music in light of the interconnections between performing traditions and media archaeologies: from opera to musical multimedia, and from cinema to interactive audio-visual platforms.

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