Don’t fence me in: Borders, frontiers, and diasporas

IASPM-US 2009 Conference
University of California, San Diego
May 29-31, 2009
San Diego, CA
The deadline for submission of abstracts has been extended to December 22

Borders, boundaries, and frontiers have intersected and interacted with popular music in differing ways, times, and places, and oftentimes these relationships have been particularly resonant in diasporic communities. Taking an open-ended approach to borders and boundaries as types of thresholds and to frontiers as kinds of liminal zones, this conference seeks to explore their significance in popular music in terms of the aesthetics of genre and style, the politics of personal and social identity, and the dynamics of time and place. Potential issues for discussion include technology, media, industry gatekeepers, changing business practices, gender, migration, ethnicity, nationality, language, and changing definitions of music that involve region and era. The program committee of the 2009 conference of IASPM-US invites proposals for papers, panels, or roundtables relating to these ideas and, of course, welcomes proposals on any aspect of popular music. Continue reading “Don’t fence me in: Borders, frontiers, and diasporas”

Sound Property? Investigating the Legal Status of Sound Recordings

An Interdisciplinary Conference on Music & Copyright
University of Salford, UK February 18-19, 2009

This conference proposes to investigate the current U.S. and U.K. statutes that regulate the protection of sound recordings. It will inquire to what degree those laws secure the rights of both the owners and creators of the music contained on these products as well as determine their impact upon those who consume and comment upon this material. The pending efforts to universalize an extended term of copyright underscore the potential for even more draconian controls upon recorded music. Will the public, creators, and commentators continue to be able to acquire, appreciate and appropriate musical materials? Can some balance be found between the need for profit and the pursuit of pleasure? Is it possible in a civil society for music effectively to be silenced through constraints over its recorded legacy?
Continue reading “Sound Property? Investigating the Legal Status of Sound Recordings”

The bolero in Caribbean culture and its worldwide circulation

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The Ministry of Culture of the Dominican Republic, the Eduardo León Jimenes Cultural Center (Centro León) and the Institute of Caribbean Studies (INEC) announce the International Conference “The Bolero in Caribbean Culture and Its Worldwide Circulation,” to be celebrated April 17, 18, and 19, 2009, in the facilities of the Centro León, in Santiago de los Caballeros, Dominican Republic.

This is the third edition of the conference Music, Identity, and Culture in the Caribbean (MIC), which has been declared an “Event of High Cultural Interest” by the Ministry of Culture of the Dominican Republic. Continue reading “The bolero in Caribbean culture and its worldwide circulation”

Going Coastal: Peripheries and Centres in Popular Music

Call for Papers
International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) Canada
Dalhousie University, Halifax
June 12-14, 2009

IASPM-CA is pleased to call for proposals, panels and roundtables for this special interdisciplinary conference on the theme of “Peripheries and Centres.” We also welcome submissions on any aspect of popular music.
We are aiming for as broad a representation of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives as possible and hope for a conference that will provide perspectives on and (re)evaluations of the periphery/centre relationship as it relates to popular music. What changes are affecting the concepts of centre and periphery and related notions like mainstream and fringe, heartland and hinterland, privileged and marginal, mass culture and subculture? How should they be rethought? Is there still a “centre” (generically, geographically, economically, ideologically) in popular music in the 21st century? Continue reading “Going Coastal: Peripheries and Centres in Popular Music”

Dance Music Sex Romance: Pop and the Body Politic

2009 Pop Conference at EMP|SFM
April 16-19, 2009, Seattle, WA
Call for Proposals
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Though Prince seems to have bowdlerized “D.M.S.R.” in his concerts since becoming a Jehovah’s Witness, the relationship of pop music to sex, love, physical movement, and the body rarely stays hidden very long. For this year’s Pop Conference we invite presentations, addressing any period or style of music, that bring erotic and sensual issues to the forefront and connect them to political and aesthetic concerns. Rock and roll has long congratulated itself on riding the Big Beat over all sanctimonious opposition, but can we take our sense of these archetypal struggles somewhere beyond, say, Footloose? Continue reading “Dance Music Sex Romance: Pop and the Body Politic”

Migrating Music: Media, Politics and Style

An international conference
Venue: School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
Date: 10-11 July, 2009

Over the last twenty years or so there has been much interest in music and diaspora, that is in migrating music. No doubt this interest is historically grounded. Movement of peoples and their music across the world has been occurring to an unprecedented extent and in novel ways.

Researchers in a variety of disciplines have then responded by studying musical flows and the formation of hybrid styles, but also the way in which apparently similar music can mean quite different things in different contexts. We might sum up the overarching framework as one in which researchers focus on the (largely benign) diversification and pluralisation of musical meaning and experience.

We do not seek to overturn this framework. Quite simply, it taps an important part of the reality of migrating music in the contemporary period. But we do want to bring up a number of problems and issues, and call on colleagues to think about what these might mean. Continue reading “Migrating Music: Media, Politics and Style”

Analysing the Musically Sensuous

Call for Papers

Society for Music Analysis Autumn Study Day
University of Liverpool, School of Music
22 November 2008

For most listeners to music, sensuous affect is of primary, perhaps even singular, importance. Our responses to music in everyday situations, ranging from background ambience to pounding film scores to sources of studious contemplation, are mediated through music’s sculpting of sensual, physical, emotional and affective experiences.

Yet when it comes to analyzing the musically sensuous, music theory and analysis have proved stubbornly resistant to (and perhaps even fearful of) engaging with the musically sensuous, often retreating instead into ostensibly more cerebral studies of the musically syntactical. This one-day conference seeks to contribute to the process of redressing that imbalance, not least by acknowledging that separations of the sensuous and syntactical in music are, at best, artificial necessities for study and, at worst, utterly misleading. Continue reading “Analysing the Musically Sensuous”

New Jazz Histories: a one day symposium

Call for Papers
Jazz Research Journal special issue
19 November 2008
Adelphi House, University of Salford

“History is his story – my story is a mystery” (Sun Ra)
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Since the mid-1990s jazz scholars have challenged established jazz histories, using a range of critical methodologies to examine the constructed nature of existing narratives. More recently, studies have set out either to write new jazz histories or to expose the underlying ideologies of canon formation and a linear tradition found within the jazz mainstream.

This one day symposium will explore the theme of New Jazz Histories, using Alyn Shipton’s New History of Jazz (Continuum, 2007 [2nd edition]) as a starting point for discussion. Alyn Shipton will provide an introduction to the event, focusing on the problems of reconciling academic history, oral history and discographical concerns in one synoptic history. Subsequent papers may seek to use Shipton’s work as a starting point for discussion, exploring the nature of jazz history. The event aims to provide an interdisciplinary context for discussing and developing a deeper critical understanding of what jazz is.

The review committee welcomes papers that cover one or more of the following topics:

  • Writing new jazz histories
  • Tradition and lineage
  • The origins of jazz
  • Causality and teleological narration
  • Historical revisionism
  • Canonisation and cultural value
  • The mythology of jazz
  • Progress and modernity
  • Forms of jazz historiography
  • Jazz modernism, postmodernism and the avant garde
  • Community and boundary
  • Subverting dominant codes and conventions

Selected papers will feature as articles in a special issue of the Jazz Research Journal, to be published in 2009. Therefore, authors must ensure that submissions have not been previously published or being considered for publication elsewhere.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted to Tony Whyton by 15 September 2008.

Review panel: Tony Whyton (University of Salford), Nicholas Gebhardt (University of Lancaster), Catherine Parsonage (Open University) and George McKay (University of Salford)

Music, Culture and Globalisation

Call for Papers
Annual Conference of the British Forum for Ethnomusicology 2009
http://www.bfe2009.net
Submission deadline: 30 November 2008

The Annual Conference of the BFE will be held from 16 – 19 April 2009, and hosted by the Popular Music Studies Unit at Liverpool John Moores University, UK. This 4-day conference seeks to generate new perspectives and understandings on the interrelatedness of music, culture and globalisation through stimulating interdisciplinary and intercultural theoretical dialogues, and thereby moving beyond those conceptualisations that are already established in ethnomusicology and other music-related disciplines. To this end, various guest speakers will be engaged to contribute a range of different theoretical perspectives on a more contemporary understanding of music and global culture. The keynote will be delivered by Professor John Tomlinson, Professor of Cultural Sociology and authority on the cultural aspects of the globalisation process.

Submissions are now invited on any aspect of the theme with papers that seek to explore newer issues relating to this subject, including, but by no means limited to, the following: (1) Musical traditions in transformation; (2) Music, place and identity; (3) New centres and peripheries? ; (4) Music, mediation and tourism; (5) New approaches to ethnographic enquiry and research methods. Abstracts (approximately 300 words) for paper presentations lasting 20 minutes should be submitted by 30 November 2008. Film shows and performances may also be proposed, as may pre-formed panels or workshop sessions, for which a longer abstract with named speakers should be submitted (approximately 1,000 words).

The Annual BFE Conference will be held in Liverpool (UK), a buzzing musical city that has just celebrated its 800th birthday in 2007 and continues celebrations as European Capital of Culture 2008. Liverpool is renowned for its vibrant music culture and the Beatles, football, maritime heritage, arts and culture, shopping, and exciting nightlife, and there will be time during the conference to explore its fabulous attractions. There will be a conference dinner and party on Saturday evening, and a themed night and a range of live music performances are also planned.

Detailed information on all aspects of the conference can be found on the
BFE conference website, or obtained directly from Dr
Simone Krüger, BFE 2009 Conference Organiser.

Reminder: Popular Music Worlds, Popular Music Histories (Closing Date: July 1, 2008)

Call for Papers

Popular Music Worlds, Popular Music Histories
IASPM 15th biennial conference

University of Liverpool, UK
July 13-17, 2009

For its 15th biennial conference, the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) invites papers which explore the various connections and disconnections between popular musical worlds and popular music histories. Given Liverpool’s important place in relation to both areas, it will provide an ideal setting for papers submitted to the following streams:

Studying Popular Music: A Reassessment
Convenor: Martha Tupinambá de Ulhôa

Since the first attempts in the late 1970s and 1980s much has been done in terms of adapting analytical tools from several disciplines to the study of popular music. This stream welcomes papers dealing with the analysis of specific aspects of popular music (timbre, texture, prosody, melody, rhythm, harmony, arranging, etc.) or case studies of particular songs or instrumental pieces from any theoretical perspective.

Popular Music and Technology in a Historical Context
Convenor: Carlo Nardi

Different intellectual technologies have contributed to the way people produce and listen to popular music, be it orality, printing, recording or even the Internet. This stream welcomes papers dealing with the technological impacts upon popular music practices, including questions from cultural, aesthetic, ideological, economic, sociological, historical, legal or musicological perspectives.

Music, History and Cultural Memory
Convenor: Shane Homan

This stream seeks contributions that investigate popular music histories and the methodological challenges in their researching and writing. What particular historical narratives and agendas emerge, and what are their effects? The stream includes work that examines the role of popular music history in wider national histories and their presence in both informal (e.g. fan club newsletters) and formal (e.g. museums) contexts. Papers are also welcome that explore the role of ‘unofficial’ / ‘shadow’ music histories that challenge or offer alternatives to grander narratives and industry mythologies, to comprehend a politics of cultural memory studies in terms of what is officially preserved from oblivion and what is socially excluded from remembrance.

Music, Mediation and Place
Convenor: Geoff Stahl

The intersection of place-making and music-making as a site of mediation is a complicated one. From the use of certain music scenes or moments which have been mobilized as heritage myths and tourist packages, to issues related to the use of micro and mass media to bind musicmakers together–locally, regionally, nationally, and globally–the intersection of time and place as a highly mediated process has proven a vexed and complex phenomenon. We welcome papers which explore the many issues relating to music histories, representations, discourses, spaces and places, as well as those that consider the various research methods which might be best be deployed to capture this phenomenon.

Musical Struggles
Convenor: Michael Drewett

Being a musician inevitably involves struggle: Musicians starting out struggle to make it, musicians ‘in the margins’ struggle towards mainstream coverage, some musicians involve themselves in political struggle to do with identity issues and/or social issues, while in contexts of censorship, repression and control some musicians struggle to be heard. Even commercially successful musicians can become embroiled in corporate struggle over contractual obligations. This stream seeks contributions which document and conceptualise such struggles within a socio-political framework.

Abstracts should be no longer than 250 words (one page) and should be sent in the following format:

Title
Presenter(s)
Institution
Email
Abstract
Keywords (five keywords that best describe your topic)

Abstracts should be sent to BOTH the conference address and the convenor of your stream. The conference address is:

iaspm2009@iaspm.net

Please label your abstract with your last name (i.e. smith.rtf, or smith.doc), not the title.

The deadline for abstracts is July 1, 2008.

We will notify participants no later than November 1st, 2008.

We look forward to seeing you.

The IASPM-International Executive