cfp: The U2 Conference

The U2 Conference
http://u2conference.com/  

Heartland: U2’s Looking For American Soul
An International Virtual U2 Conference For Scholars And Fans
October 18 – 24, 2020

U2 has journeyed – at times uneasily – through an America of pulsating metropolis, rugged heartland and shining sea. It long ago fell under the spell of America, but for just as long has felt it still hasn’t found America.

When U2 talks about America, it often describes it in terms of an idea, a dream or an experiment rather than a physical reality. Bono sings in “American Soul” (ft. Kendrick Lamar) on Songs of Experience: “It’s not a place / This country is to me a sound / Of drum and bass. … It’s not a place / This country is to me a thought / That offers grace / For every welcome that is sought.”

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IASPM 2021 (Daegu, South Korea, July 6-10, 2021) update

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Greetings!

The Local Organizing Committee is pleased to invite you to the 21st Biennial Conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music to be held in Daegu, South Korea, for 5 days from July 6 to 10, 2021. Here are some latest updates on the conference.

1) Thanks to popular demands, we decided to extend deadline for abstract submission for one month until 31 August 2020. The submission can be made through the IASPM 2021 website (http://iaspm2021.org/index.php?gt=abs/abs01)

* Abstract Submission: until August 31, 2020 (Korea time GMT+8)

2) The IASPM 2021 registration fee has been set. We will deliver you with the registration guide when the payment system is completed.

3) We are delighted to introduce you Keynote Speakers for IASPM 2021:

– Britta Sweers (Director of the Center for Global Studies at the University of Bern, Switzerland)

– Shuhei Hosokawa (Professor Emeritus at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies)

– Chan E. Park (Professor, Ohio State University, United States)

– Jung-Sun Lee (Singer-songwriter, Guitarist, and former professor of Seoul Arts University, Korea)

4) IASPM 2021will proceed as announced in spite of the uncertainty caused by COVID-19

Despite the on-going worldwide crisis of COVID-19, the local organizing committee is working hard to make IASPM 2021 in Daegu happen. Depending on the situation in 2021, the conference could take the form of real, virtual, or hybrid. We are preparing for every possible scenario to ensure IASPM 2021 to be a successful conference. IASPM 2021 will be greatly benefitted from host city Daegu’s world-class capacity for COVID-19 control. In close cooperation with Daegu Metropolitan City, we will make sure a safe and sound conference experience for all participants. Thank you!

For further details, please visit IASPM 2021 website at http://iaspm2021.org/index.php.

Call for applications: Electronic Music Journalism

Berlin-based electronic music magazine GROOVE is teaming up with Goethe-Institute for a digital workshop programme on international electronic music journalism organized by Kristoffer Cornils and Laura Aha. We are inviting young journalists from all over the world and specifically from the so-called Global South to apply for the programme with the aim of developing a written, in-depth feature on their respective local scene. Applications are now open until August 3rd. 

The two-week seminar block will take place online from the 17th to the 28th of August and is open for the general public. Once the seminars are concluded, the ten selected participants will take action on their own: in coordination with the editors of GROOVE, they will write an article focusing on the regional specifics of electronic music in their own countries, in their native language and with a respective English translation. Besides the opportunity of having their piece published in both languages by GROOVE in November this year, the participation in the workshop programme and the article will be compensated by the Goethe-Institut with a one-time payment of € 500 per participant.

Find the whole announcement here:

https://groove.de/2020/06/29/global-groove-electronic-music-journalism/

cfp: XXI Biennial IASPM Conference in Daegu, South Korea

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“Climates of Popular Music”, 21st Biennial Conference of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music

See also the conference website for more details http://www.iaspm2021.org

Call for Presentations

The most pressing issue for humanity in the 21st century is global climate, and thus IASPM’s 21st Conference turns its attention towards this subject. Whereas our 20th anniversary conference considered where we have been, we now ask where we are now, what we are doing as a species, and what impact it has on our communities and our world. On a planet increasingly interconnected by a dizzying array of media channels, such a discussion has to be broadly framed. Our planet’s climate is impacted by numerous forms of human activity, including those that are individual, personal, local, communal, institutional, commercial, corporate, cultural, political, and international. This conference invites presentations that ask how popular music relates to our climate, where climate relates to any part of the totality of surrounding conditions and circumstances affecting growth or development. By “climate,” we intend to include a range of definitions, including ecological climate, political climates, socio-political climates, and contextual and individuated climates. We ask presenters to consider the impacts of activities related to popular music and its cultures on variously defined climates, and the impacts of changing or changed climates on different popular music and its contexts. 

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cfp: Born to Be Alive: Live Music as a Crucial Dimension of 21st Century Popular Music – Special Issue

Call for Papers: Born to Be Alive: Live Music as a Crucial Dimension of 21st Century Popular Music – Special Issue | Ethnomusicology Review

https://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/content/call-papers-born-be-alive-live-music-crucial-dimension-21st-century-popular-music-special

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cfp: Independent Music Labels: Histories, Practices and Values

Independent Music Labels: Histories, Practices and Values

03-04.12.2020 | Lisbon | NOVA FCSH

Within the field of popular music studies, little attention has been given to the impacts of independent music labels outside the Anglo-Saxon context, particularly in the production, dissemination and consumption of music in semi-peripheral countries such as Portugal. On the other hand, when the scope of the reflection goes beyond the Anglo-Saxon context the study of major record companies has been privileged over small structures of local / national scope which operate independently from these large companies and/or media groups with a transnational reach. Starting from broader discussions about the relationship between the local and the global in music production, this colloquium proposes a discussion on the impact of independent music labels with a particular focus on the Portuguese context and/or in contexts that are similarly located outside the main production centers. We will take as a starting point some recognized (yet open to scrutiny) assumptions about independent labels in the field of music production: the dissemination and making available of local musics and artists in opposition to the hegemony of global (mostly Anglo-Saxon) artists and genres released by multinationals; the valuing of aesthetic and artistic dimensions in music making at the expense of its commercial potential; the forms of organization and work that are innovative and adaptable to the changing contexts in the record sector, particularly in the new millennium. This is an inter and multidisciplinary colloquium accepting proposals in disciplines such as musicology, ethnomusicology, sociology, anthropology and history, among others. We also hope to establish a dialogue between the academy and the record sector with the presence and participation of independent label managers.

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cfp: Transformational POP. 4th IASPM D-A-CH Conference, 22-24 October, Paderborn

call for papers

Transformational POP

Transitions, Breaks, and Crises in Popular Music (Studies)

4th Biennial IASPM D-A-CH Conference, 22–24 October 2020

Paderborn University/Germany, Faculty of Humanities and Arts, Department of Music – Popular Music and Media

Organizational Committee: IASPM D-A-CH Executive Committee and Advisory Board +  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Beate Flath, Prof. Dr. Christoph Jacke, Manuel Troike (Local hosts)

Pop music cultures, in their entire breadth, are seismographs of social, political, economic, ecological, media, artistic, and technological transformations. In and through them, fields of tensions, disruptions, and lines of conflict become not only visible, audible and perceptible, but also communicable and thus, negotiable. Economic and ecological crises, social structural changes, political shifts, communicative-media discourses, atmospheric moods, and disturbances of the most diverse kind cannot be appreciated in isolation from specific sounds, performances, lyrics, images, stars, genres, etc. Therefore, these are always changing in the process: pop music cultures transform and are themselves transformed. “Pop is transformational, always. It is a dynamic movement in which cultural materials and its social environments mutually reshape each other, crossing previously fixed boundaries: class boundaries, ethnic boundaries or cultural boundaries [own translation].“ (Diedrich Diederichsen, Pop – deskriptiv, normativ, emphatisch (1996). In: Charis Goer, Stefan Greif, Christoph Jacke (Eds.): Texte zur Theorie des Pop, 2013: 188)

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cfp: Transcultural Hip-Hop

CALL FOR PAPERS

Transcultural Hip-Hop: Constructing and Contesting Identity, Space, and Place in the Americas and beyond

University of Bern, Switzerland, October 30 – 31, 2020

Almost fifty years after its birth, hip-hop is considered a truly global phenomenon that combines elements of uniformity with local symbols and expressions regarding musical forms, lyrics, performances, and social content. It can be said that within the US context, hip-hop emerged during the 1970s as an African American subculture. However, from its very beginning hip-hop has been a highly transcultural and hybrid phenomenon that integrates various musical elements and forms of cultural expression. In addition to African American popular culture, for example, Caribbean and Latin American music styles, language and dance played a vital role in the formation and development of hip-hop on both coasts of the US. The entanglement of diverse cultures and diasporas on the evolution of hip-hop as a music and as a movement, in the urban settings of New York and Los Angeles, for example, encourages us to think of these different musical, cultural, and social traits in more fluid or hybrid terms. 

Furthermore, diasporic identity in the multicultural neighborhoods where hip-hop first emerged is also fluid concerning the interaction between diasporic “peripheries” and their centers of origin. This conference aims to focus on the transcultural, inter-ethnic and diasporic exchanges that created hip-hop and helped to spread it within the US and beyond. The conference asks how identity markers bound by ethnic, cultural, and spatial categories are being negotiated in hip-hop. While concentrating on the Americas, the conference will also include papers that focus on other world regions and on transregional entanglements.

Within the framework of transculturality, the organizers wish to focus on three principal areas of enquiry:

A. Identity Politics in Hip-Hop

In the context of US hip-hop, many scholars argue that hip-hop should be understood with regard to its African American “centrality” (Ogbar 2007; Perry 2004). While this is not disputed by the conference organizers per se, we ask how can we better understand the hybridity of hip-hop music and culture, both at its point of origin, and as a global phenomenon? Furthermore, how do other minority groups and diasporas draw upon ´African American´ cultural markers to legitimate their contributions to the genre? How do local and global hip-hop movements reproduce and adapt such identity markers to different social and political contexts and agendas? In doing so, notions of identity and authenticity are contested and broadened over time.

B. Movement, Reproduction and Hybridity of Cultural Signifiers in Hip-Hop

Following on from these themes and borrowing from Appadurai’s (1996) understanding of cultural flows or ‘scapes’ in an era of globalization, one way of understanding the myriad creations of hybrid identity constructions in hip-hop is to identify and unpack the reproduction and merging of cultural signifiers, be they musical, visual, linguistic or otherwise. Which cultural symbols are (re-)produced in a particular context, and how do local or national cultural forms interact with transnational and global cultural flows? How does cultural politics shape the negotiation of cultural signifiers? Finally, for minority groups establishing themselves in different diasporic contexts, what is their relationship with their home or national culture from afar, and how do they shape the transcultural dynamics of centers of hip-hop production?

C. Space & Place in Hip-Hop

Like no other musical genre, hip-hop reflects a unique importance of space and identity(Rose 1994; Forman 2002). From its very inception in New York City, representing one’s neighborhood at battles was a central part of hip-hop culture. When Los Angeles became the center of gangster rap in the late 1980s, African American and Latino rap artists highlighted the intermingling of hip-hop with gang culture on the West Coast. The East Coast/West Coast feud in the mid-1990s, culminating in the deaths of Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls, pointed to the collision of geographical and musical spaces when negotiating spatial identities and affiliations. Thus, in its myriad forms and expressions in the US and around the globe, hip-hop’s “powerful ties to place” (Forman 2002) are omnipresent and reflected by artist names, languages and local slang as well as references to specific geographical markers and signature musical styles of a particular locality. How are common issues of marginalization and contested localities being negotiated in hiphop? What can these place-identities tell us about the political, socio-geographic and cultural context hip-hop culture is produced in?

The conference will be held in English and prospective participants should please send a title and abstract of up to 300 words to keith.cann@hist.unibe.ch by March 15, 2020.

Travel and accommodation costs will be covered thanks to funding from the Swiss National Science Foundation.

cfp: KISMIF Conference in Porto 2020 + Summer School 2020

We are organizing the fifth KISMIF Conference, happening in Porto, 8-11 July 2020. The conference will take place in The Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the University of Porto, Casa da Música and Rivoli Municipal Theatre of Porto, among others, for four days of multidisciplinary presentations and discussions about “DIY Cultures and Global Challenges”.

On July 7th Rivoli Municipal Theatre of Porto will also host the Summer School ‘Not Just Holidays in the Sun’ which will offer an opportunity for all interested persons, including those participating in the Conference, to attend workshops directed by specialists in their fields.

Please take some time to read and share the call for papers. You can also read them online and share the links.

Conference call for papers: https://www.kismifconference.com/call-conference/

Summer School call for papers: https://www.kismifconference.com/call-summer-school/

All the information here: https://www.kismifconference.com/