norient academic online journal

With the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM) approaching its 30th birthday norient wants to contribute to this anniversary by dedicating its first issue of the norient academic online journal to popular music ethnographies – with a twist. While IASPM has been a major force in contributing to the study of popular music using a methodologically broad approach these studies have to a large extent been focused on a North American and British/European popular music legacy.

This call for articles which will result in the first volume and issue of the norient academic online journal aims to show the diversity of popular music throughout the world by focusing on popular music in a broad sense from outside the European and North American canon of popular music. Continue reading

TRANS – Special Issue: New uses of music in media

TRANS- Transcultural Music Review 16 (2012) will publish a special dossier on the new forms of music in audiovisual media. The dossier will be prepared in collaboration with the research group “Música y medios audiovisuales” from the Society for Ethnomusicology-SIBE/IASPM-Spain and will be edited by Teresa Fraile, Eduardo Viñuela, and María Edurne Zuazu. Continue reading

Contemporary Music and Fiction – Edited Volume

Submissions are sought for a collection of essays titled Write in Tune: Representing Contemporary Music in Fiction.
Edited by Jeffrey Roessner (Mercyhurst College) and Erich Hertz (Siena College)
Submission deadline: January 31, 2010

Since the 1960s the confluence of music and literature has moved far beyond simple adaptation studies, with writers turning to music for cultural references, foundational metaphors, and complex intertextual structure.  Indeed, the range of novels that reference contemporary music is stunning, from obvious examples such as Roddy Doyle’s The Commitments, Nick Hornby’s High Fidelity, Jonathan Lethem’s Fortress of Solitude, Alan Warner’s Morvern Callar, and Sherman Alexie’s Reservation Blues, to more subtle intertextual negotiations in Irvine Welsh’s Trainspotting, Willy Russell’s The Wrong Boy, and Don DeLillo’s Great Jones Street. Continue reading

The New Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments

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Oxford University Press intends to publish a second, revised and expanded edition of The New Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments, originally issued in 1984. Reflecting advances in scholarship during the past quarter-century, the second edition will encompass a greater range of subjects in more detail, thus serving a larger community of readers worldwide. Continue reading

Michael Jackson: Musical Subjectivities

Popular Music and Society Special Issue
Edited by Susan Fast and Stan Hawkins
Call for Submissions

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Submissions are invited for a special edition of Popular Music and Society that examines constructions of subjectivity in Michael Jackson’s music, with a focus on gender, sexuality, age, disability, and race. Contributors are invited to address ways in which Jackson’s vocality, grooves, rhythmic invention, songwriting, conformity with and/or irreconcilability of generic categories, particular songs, song categories (such as ballads) or albums, record production, use of technology, and live or mediated performance work to produce his own, often spectacularized, subjectivities, as well as those of his listeners. Continue reading

JISM – Journal of Interdisciplinary Music Studies

Call for contributions

The Journal of Interdisciplinary Music Studies (JIMS) is an international peer-reviewed journal. Published twice per year, it aims to establish a broad interdisciplinary platform for music researchers. JIMS especially promotes collaborations between sciences and humanities and between theory and practice, and provocative submissions that stimulate interdisciplinary discussion.

The journal aims:

  • to contribute towards an understanding of music in all its manifestations, definitions and contexts
  • to promote interdisciplinary synergy among humanities, sciences and practically oriented disciplines
  • to promote academic quality and the application of research findings
  • The journal accepts original submissions associated with:

  • all subdisciplines or paradigms of musicology, including analytical, applied, comparative, cultural, empirical, ethnological, historical, popular, scientific, systematic and theoretical, and
  • all musically relevant disciplines, including acoustics, aesthetics, anthropology, archeology, art history and theory, biology, cognitive sciences, composition, computing, cultural studies, economics, education, engineering, ethnology, gender studies, history, linguistics, literary studies, mathematics, medicine, music theory and analysis, neurosciences, perception, performance, philosophy, physiology, popular music, prehistory, psychoacoustics, psychology, religious studies, semiotics, sociology, sport, statistics and therapy.
  • All submissions must have at least two authors representing contrasting disciplines. Please consult the journal’s homepage for detailed submission guidelines and procedures.

    JIMS is indexed by:
    Répertoire International de Littérature Musicale (RILM)
    Direct Open Access Journals (DOAJ)
    INTUTE: Arts and Humanities
    ZDB OPAC (Zeitschriftendatenbank)
    HeBIS-Verbundkatalog

    Contact: Ali C. Gedik, administrative editor.

    Popular Music and Society – Special Issue on Journalism and Popular Music

    Submissions are invited for a special edition of Popular Music and Society, which will focus on the general theme of journalism and popular music.

    Contributors are invited to consider the topic in diverse ways; possible themes might include:

    • the status of the "critic"
    • the politics of fanzines
    • popular music periodicals and magazines
    • the functions of the rock/pop journalist: concert reviews; album reviews; interviews
    • perspectives on the audience(s)
    • TV, radio, and online journalism
    • case studies: publications; musical genres; performers; journalists
    • popular music coverage in the mainstream press (tabloid and quality)
    • professional issues: creativity and control; career trajectory; training and entry
    • specialist publications (metal; country; jazz; blues)
    • histories of the music media
    • the growth of the profession
    • social and musical imagery in the media: ethnicity; gender; disability; sexuality
    • global perspectives
    • the music press and the charts
    • journalistic strategies and techniques
    • journalism theory: research; objectivity vs. subjectivity; gatekeepers
    • photojournalism
    • the significance of degree programs: Journalism; Popular Music Studies
    • the press conference
    • marketing and advertising strategies

    In the first instance, potential contributors are asked to submit abstracts (approximately 250 words) and brief CVs by November 1, 2008.

    Those selected for inclusion will then be invited to submit articles (6,000-8,000 words) by November 1, 2009.

    The issue of Popular Music and Society will be published in 2010.

    Please address all communication to the Guest Editor:

    Dr. Ian Inglis
    Reader in Popular Music Studies
    Media & Communication
    Lipman Building
    University of Northumbria
    Newcastle upon Tyne
    NE1 8ST
    UK

    Email: ian.inglis@unn.ac.uk
    Telephone: 0191 227 3417

    Journal on the Art of Record Production

    Call For Articles for the Journal on the Art of Record Production
    Issue 3: Editor – Simon Zagorski-Thomas
    Deadline: 30th May 2008

    Themes:

    Business Models and The Production Process
    This would involve articles on issues such how changing production techniques on the question of authorship, copyright and even the ontology of music. It could also include articles on how artists and producers are developing new business models in the face of the rapidly changing industry.

    Recording and Mix Techniques
    This would involve articles on the various ways that producers and engineers shape the sound of a recording through the use of microphone selection and placement, the use of room ambience, equalisation, dynamic processing, effects, editing techniques, stereo or surround mixing techniques etc. They might describe techniques used / developed / made famous by particular individuals or more general treatises on common practice, the psychoacoustics of particular techniques etc.

    Please submit completed pieces for peer review:
    Full article: 5 – 7,000 words
    Position paper: 3 – 5,000 words
    Provocations: up to 1,000 words (pieces by industry professionals or academics designed to stimulate debate)

    Please send submissions to Simon Zagorski-Thomas
    Website: www.artofrecordproduction.com

    The Arab Avant-Garde

    The Arab Avant-Garde: Musical Innovation in the Middle East
    Edited by Thomas Burkhalter, Kay Dickinson and Benjamin J. Harbert

    We are currently soliciting chapter proposals for an anthology on the largely under-researched area of avant-garde music affiliated to the Arab world. All definitions of experimentalism and any disciplinary (or anti-disciplinary) approaches will be considered as we are hoping to produce as varied a volume as possible. The Arab avant-garde is to be taken as boundary work from both perspectives of pulling from the outside of tradition and of pushing from the inside of tradition; in other words, both iconoclasm and radical traditional expansion are equal targets. That said, discussions of the avant- garde as repeated practices of established boundary work or investigations into conventional vanguards are also welcome.

    The Arab Avant-Garde, as a title, mobilizes two already complicated concepts whose alignment asks a number of challenging questions. Firstly, there are the issues of invoking the avant-garde – a term with particularly Eurocentric resonances – within a supposedly “other” geopolitical imaginary. Here one might wish to: draw on or challenge the models of alternative modernities; posit crucial lineages of radical innovation within or via the Arab world; critique or reaffirm the presumed stabilities of “tradition”; or insist upon shared global projects of cultural rejuvenation that do not prioritize points of arrival or departure.

    Then there are issues of place to consider. To what extent is the Arab avant-garde partially constructed from “outside” as, for example, a marketing category and what are the political repercussions of this? What might we mean by “Arab” anyhow, and where, amidst this term, could we place stateless minority groups such as the Kurds or settled diaspora groups? How do the fraught histories of nationalisms and other unities frame the Arab avant-garde? And where might all this be situated, in terms of origins, performance or suitable places for scholarly attention, to name but a few crucial locales?

    In order to address these intricate problematics, we encourage work from diverse disciplinary traditions, including and traversing: music, history, cultural studies, ethnography, Middle East area studies, sociology and subcultural geography. We would happily welcome straight academic essays, as well as more experimental submissions, interviews and translations. Word lengths to be negotiated.

    Deadline for short abstract: 5.May 2008

    Please email the abstract to: arabavantgarde@norient.com