cfp: Popular Music, Decolonization and Indigenous Studies (IASPM Journal)

CALL FOR PAPERS

Special Issue: Popular Music, Decolonization and Indigenous Studies

Editors: Daniel Hernandez and Kirsten Zemke

IASPM Journal is the peer-reviewed open-access e-journal of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music, IASPM. As part of an international network, the journal aims to publish research and analysis in the field of popular music studies at both global and local levels.

This Special Issue seeks to confront the Western tradition of academia, which has only been made possible through historic and ongoing processes and ideologies of colonialism. This includes the paradox that many academic scholars and institutions are housed on stolen lands. This Special Issue of IASPM Journal aims to contribute to an ongoing process of decolonization through the lens and practices of popular music by highlighting Indigenous academics, theorists and musical explorations.

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cfp: The Sound of the Past

What is the role of sound in historical fictions? How can we try to replicate what the world sounded like in the past? What is the role of music in period dramas? Why are contemporary musicals with historical settings so popular? How can sound be described in historical novels?

The Journal of Historical Fictions is looking for papers on any aspect of “sound”, broadly defined (music, mechanical sounds, songs that tell a historical narrative, voices, etc.) for a special issue on sound in historical fictions, ‘The Sound of the Past’. Please send completed articles of 6,000–8,000 words to mail@historicalfictionsjournal.org by 1 January 2020.

See our submission guidelines here:

http://historicalfictionsjournal.org/submit.html

We also have a rolling deadline for articles that relate directly to research and teaching questions on historical fictions of any kind, from all scholarly disciplines, and we welcome spontaneous submissions.

cfp: Jazz Research Journal

Call for Papers: Issues of Diversity and Inclusion in Jazz Festivals

A Special Issue of the Jazz Research Journal

Guest Editors: Emily Jones (Cheltenham Jazz Festival) and Sarah Raine (Birmingham City University, UK)

With campaigns such as Keychange (PRS Foundation, UK) bringing issues of diversity and inclusion to the fore in the music industry, professionals and researchers alike are increasingly aware of a lack of diversity in relation to jazz audiences, artists and festival staff. However, the efforts to tackle these issues lack a strong foundation of research, from either industry bodies or scholarship. Emerging out of an industry partnership project, this special issue therefore aims to provide a space for current research that engages with issues of diversity and inclusion in jazz festivals. We particularly encourage submissions that take an intersectional approach, emerge out of collaborative projects between institutions and industry, or go beyond the geographies and narratives that have come to dominate definitions of jazz.

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cfp: French Historical Studies: Music and French History/La musique et l’histoire française

Call for Papers from French Historical Studies: Music and French History/La musique et l’histoire française

The editors of French Historical Studies seek articles for a special issue on music in the Francophone world to appear in 2022.

The history of the music of France has traditionally been studied as a separate category without the same robust interest as other cultural artifacts such as film and literature. More recent scholarship illuminates the place of music in French society and suggests that more work should be done to sketch out the particular place of music in all its forms in French history.

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cfp: ZINES – An international journal on amateur and DIY media

Launch : Issue #1 – April 2020

Call for papers

ZINES is an international peer journal dedicated to studies of amateur and do-it-yourself media of any kind, from fanzines to webzines, perzines to science zines, artzines to poezines, etc.

ZINES is multi-disciplinary and opened to all scientific disciplines, from social sciences to medical sciences, art and design, media studies, etc. The first aim of the journal is to study the involvement of amateurs in the production of mediascapes, from printing form to cybermedia. It also addresses the impact of zine making for personal or collective sociabilization, especially in closed environments such as carceral or medical centres. The second aim is to examine the production of new form of communication by amateurs leading to the publication of media with a strong DIY ethos, including scholars who invent new forms of dissemination of scientific knowledge.

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Call for articles: Oxford Handbook of Global Popular Music

Invitation for expressions of interest for submitting a chapter to the Oxford Handbook of Global Popular Music, to be edited by Simone Krüger Bridge.  

The Handbook offers an authoritative and state-of-the-art survey of current thinking and research in studies of global popular musics from different parts of the world. The chapters will be written by leading international figures from ethnomusicology, popular music studies, and anthropology to give critical examinations of the progress and direction of debates surrounding global popular music. The Handbook captures the vibrant, dynamic, and diverse approaches that characterize popular music across the world. The volume features a diversity of topics and approaches, structured into five conceptual parts: GLOBAL CAPITALISM, GLOBAL GENRES, MIGRATION, IDENTITY, TECHNOLOGY. The purpose of the organization is to give a comprehensive review of achievements by leading scholars in the field of global popular music to date, and to contribute to an understanding of what global popular music might become in future, charting new areas that are likely to define studies of global popular music in the coming decades.

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Call for articles: If You Could Read Our Minds: Essays on Gordon Lightfoot

Edited by Melissa Avdeeff (Coventry University) and Scott Henderson (Trent University Durham GTA)

Proposals are sought for an interdisciplinary, edited collection focused on the work and career of Canadian singer-songwriter Gordon Lightfoot.

Lightfoot’s career spans more than six decades, beginning with his emergence in the folk rock scene in Toronto’s Yorkville in the 1960s through to continued touring in the present decade. Lightfoot’s success has bridged a number of genres, including folk, pop, country, rock and a range of crossovers. A string of Top 40 hits in the 1970s cemented Lightfoot’s international reputation, both as a singer and songwriter. In addition to his own recordings, Lightfoot’s songs have also been recorded and performed by an amazing array of diverse artists., across a vast range of musical genres.

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Songwriting Studies Journal

We are pleased to announce the launch of the Songwriting Studies Journal, an initiative that emerges from the AHRC-funded Songwriting Studies Research Network based at Birmingham City University and the University of Liverpool. Since launching our series of national research events we’ve become increasingly aware of the diversity of scholarly work that intersects with songwriting. The network now seeks contributions from scholars for an inaugural issue of the journal that will help define the emerging interdisciplinary field of songwriting studies.

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cfp: Metal and the Holocaust

Call for Papers: Metal and the Holocaust
(special issue Metal Music Studies 2020, ed. Keith Kahn-Harris and Dominic Williams)

Our special issue tackles a well-known but little-studied phenomenon: the importance of Holocaust themes to the metal scene. The Holocaust has often featured as a subject of metal lyrics (from Slayer’s ‘Angel of Death’ on). It has repeatedly been referred to in descriptions of metal’s sound (e.g. the ‘Heavy Metal Holocaust’ of 1981). And it has formed part of accusations and warnings against bands who flirt with and sometimes outright endorse far-right and neo-Nazi politics.

Even with those bands – the vast majority on the scene – who do not engage in such politics, their interest in the Holocaust has frequently been seen as exploitative at best. But many metal lyricists and musicians claim that they are providing a ‘history lesson’, and many teenagers’ first acquaintance with such figures as Josef Mengele and Reinhard Heydrich surely comes from Slayer.

It is high time, therefore, that the tangled relationship of metal and the Holocaust be unpicked and examined. We wish to face up to a difficult and troubling topic, and accept that many of the ways that metal has approached it are not beyond critique. But we are also interested in possibilities that come from its incorporation and embodiment of the Holocaust. What aspects of metal’s politics need to be thought through, attended to, challenged? Can metal form a kind of historiography? Metal frequently evokes extreme affects. Does this focus provide a means of testifying to the Shoah that goes beyond the simply propositional or representational? Are such modes of remembrance exportable beyond the bounds of the metal scene, or do they only work within the particular codes and values of this subculture? How do they compare to other forms of ‘Holocaust impiety’ and other forms of representation?

We seek proposals for articles of 6,000-8,000 words. Final deadline for articles will be 1 December 2019.

Questions could include but are not limited to the following:

  • What part has metal played in transmitting knowledge of or interest in the Holocaust?
  • What place does this particular subject have within the subculture? Is it one of many horrors that its fans wish to face up to, or does it have a particular significance for them?
  • Can metal provide history lessons?
  • How has the understanding and presentation of the Holocaust by metal bands and fans been influenced by:
    • politics (including those of the far right)?
    • religious and anti-religious positions?
    • interest in Nordic and Germanic culture and themes?
  • Does metal offer ways of approaching the Holocaust from which other cultural forms can learn, e.g.
    • its tendency to avoid moralising?
    • its concentration on intense feelings rather than contemplation?
  • How has the significant history of Jewish involvement in metal culture impacted the scene’s responses to the Holocaust?
  • How have Israeli metal scenes engaged with the Holocaust?
  • Is the approach taken by these forms of music best characterised as ‘holocaust impiety’?
  • Is it possible to be ‘reflexively anti-reflexive’ about the Holocaust?

Send abstracts of 150-250 words plus a short bio note to Dominic Williams (dominic2.williams@northumbria.ac.uk) by 6 September 2019.

Riffs: Call for Proposals

Riffs: Call for Proposals
’Technology is something I love and hate at the same time. One one hand the absence of any kind of technology means silence (or an environment of natural sounds which we hear much clearer because of the general silence); on the other hand, you need technology to make art’.
Christina Kubisch, ‘Artists’ Statements II: Christina Kubisch’, in The Cambridge Companion to Electronic Music, ed. by Nick Collins and Julio d’Escriván, 2nd edn (Cambridge. Cambridge University Press, 2017:176)
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