Journal on the Art of Record Production – Relaunch‏

We are pleased to announce the relaunch of the Journal on the Art of Record Production website and issue 5 of JARP.  Aptly, the editorial, Change and Continuity: Transformations, Innovations and Tensions in the Art of Record Production, has been written by ARP 2010 conference hosts Robert Davis and Justin Morey of Leeds Metropolitan University. Continue reading

The Jazz Chameleon‏

The Refereed Proceedings of the 9th Nordic Jazz Conference August 19–20 2010, Helsinki, Finland
Edited by Janne Mäkelä

Since its arrival on the public scene in the early 20th century, jazz has been characterised by a remarkable ability to cross musical, social and cultural borderlines. In terms of musical style and character, jazz has often crossed genre categories and undergone radical changes. In terms of geographical and cultural boundaries, one of the most notable developments in jazz has been the internationalisation of its sound. Continue reading

New Book: ‘Irish Blood, English Heart’‏

Sean Campbell
‘Irish Blood, English Heart’: Second-Generation Irish Musicians in England
Cork University Press
November 2011 (Paperback)
ISBN: 9781859184905

Second-generation Irish musicians have played a vital role in the history of popular music in England. This book explores the role of Irish ethnicity in the lives and work of these musicians, focusing on three high-profile projects: Kevin Rowland and Dexys Midnight Runners, Shane MacGowan and The Pogues, and Morrissey/Marr and The Smiths. Continue reading

Sounds of then, sounds of now: Popular music in Australia

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Sounds of then, sounds of now
Popular music in Australia

Edited by Shane Homan and Tony Mitchell
Hobart: ACYS Publishing, June 2008

In Sounds of then, sounds of now: Popular music in Australia some of the country’s most respected popular music researchers, musicians and music journalists document a range of past and present Australian sounds and scenes.

The collection maps recent changes in music consumption, production and media technologies, and the implications for local industries. It reconciles local music histories with contemporary practice, and reflects upon the growth and current diversity of Australian research, music genres and contexts, including jazz, rock, folk, metal, electronica, dance music, experimental music and hip hop. Chapters examining Aboriginal, Islander and world musics offer new perspectives on local and transnational relationships between popular music, geography and culture in Australia.

This text provides a means for understanding how popular music has expressed, reflected and influenced changes in Australian society through debates about youth, nationalism, censorship, local identity, contested spaces and enduring mythologies about ‘Australianness’. While some chapters examine earlier scenes and musical forms, the emphasis is upon Australian popular music since World War 2. At the same time, every chapter is informed by global debates and themes, including popular music’s ongoing concerns with concepts such as nationalism, cultural imperialism, globalisation, authenticity, appropriation, the ‘mainstream’, subcultures, genres and the impact of new media and the internet.

The authors’ considerable experience in teaching and researching popular music studies has ensured a collection that is lively, accessible and well adapted to use in media, popular music, sociology, musicology and cultural studies courses. Each chapter contains a reference list, discography, a list of key web sites and discussion questions to assist students in linking chapter themes and issues to wider national and international debates.

At a time when Australian popular music is enjoying increasing international critical and commercial success, this wide-ranging new collection offers a critical revision of popular music’s place in Australian society.

For more information: www.acys.info/publications/acyspublishing/music

Cultural Politics 4 (1), March 2008

The latest issue of Cultural Politics has just been published:

The Voice of the People? Musicians as Political Actors
Seth Hague, John Street, and Heather Savigny on Bob Geldof, Live 8 and the legacies of Rock Against Racism

Making Space: Image-Events in an Extreme State
Johanna Drucker asks whether in our image-saturated culture works of imaginative art can have any impact?

Enjoying Neoliberalism
Jodi Dean on Slavoj Zizek, ideology, and the global formations of the neoliberal order

‘Wikivism’: From Communicative Capitalism to Organized Networks
Paul Stacey on the cultures of networked technologies, Wikis, and postrepresentative politics

Field Report
Can a Place Think? On Adam Sharr’s Heidegger’s Hut
Timothy Clark on Heidegger’s work hut at Todtnauberg, contemporary thought, and the ‘earth’

Book Review Essay
Academics Behaving Badly
Ian Gordon on intellectuals, their duties, and their engagements in Eric Lott’s The Disappearing Liberal Intellectual and Stefan Collini’s Absent Minds: Intellectuals in Britain

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Cultural Politics, Volume 4, Number 1, March 2008

History of Stardom Reconsidered Vol 1

New Publication Series on Popular Culture

Vol 1. History of Stardom Reconsidered

The International Institute for Popular Culture (IIPC) is happy to announce the launching of a new refereed online series on popular culture. It publishes monographs, edited collections and conference proceedings, and it is open for all scholars of the field.

The first volume History of Stardom Reconsidered can be downloaded as pdf files at http://iipc.utu.fi/publications.html

New group blog on (post) Soviet popular music

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Sergio and I are pleased to announce a new group blog on (post) Soviet popular music:

http://ps-popular-music.blogspot.com/

The blog is bilingual with posts both in Russian and English (or sometimes both – depending on the author). We define popular music in a broad sense, in other words anything from rock to pop.  Geographically we also include the post Soviet diaspora.

Hope you enjoy it and feel free to leave comments!

sergio and david-emil

trans 11

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TRANS  11 (2007)  is on-line now with a special issue devoted to African music, that includes articles by Simha Arom, Polo Vallejo, Nathalie Fernando, Ruth M. Stone, Willie Anku, Leonardo D’Amico, Michelle Kisliuk, Kofi Agawu, Andrew L. Kaye y Marcos Branda Lacerda. This issue is matched with  some studies about the African influence in popular and traditional Latin American music by Rolando Pérez, Luis Ferreira, Carlos Ruiz Rodríguez y Norberto Pablo Cirio.

You can check it in http://www.sibetrans.com/trans/trans11/indice11.htm