German Music Information Centre publishes book in English on “Musical Life in Germany”

With its rich cultural heritage and vibrant performance scene, Germany is a land of music. Millions of people sing in choirs or play an instrument; hundreds of theatres, orchestras, ensembles and bands ensure an offering of immense density. The new 620-page publication by the German Music Information Centre includes background details and data about music culture in Germany. “Musical Life in Germany” includes 22 articles by well-known authors from the spheres of academia, cultural policy and musical practice. Subjects range from music education and training to amateur and professional music-making and the music economy.

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Sonic Scope: New Student Journal

SONIC SCOPE: NEW APPROACHES TO AUDIOVISUAL CULTURE
An e-journal for student voices to challenge, energise and diversify engagement with audiovisual media


Sonic Scope invites fresh, intrepid and dynamic student voices to re-imagine and revise critical, interdisciplinary approaches to audiovisual media. Today’s accelerated media landscape offers an unprecedented range of audiovisual experiences, from dynamically reactive video games and ultra HD sports events, to live-streamed political rallies and YouTube vlogs. Within this expanding landscape, the relationship of music and sound to image has undergone radical cultural and aesthetic upheaval. Sonic Scope intervenes in this shifting media terrain by engaging with audiovisual events as they happen. At the same time, it uses contemporary debates to revitalise discourse on traditional audiovisual forms, such as film, opera, theatre, the sounding visual arts and intermedial music.

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New issue of JPMS and other news

Hi music writers,

It’s time to end another volume year (our second with UC Press) of Journal of Popular Music Studies. Below this I’ll paste the editors’ note for issue 31:4, written by Robin James – check out her new book The Sonic Episteme: Acoustic Resonance, Neoliberalism, and Biopolitics. And as always, I encourage you to subscribe individually, using the sliding scale fees on the IASPM-US website (http://iaspm-us.net/), or to make sure your institution – if you have one — subscribes, which helps even more.

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Volume no. 16-1: Music & Hacking

«  MUSIC & HACKING » 

Volume ! The French Journal of Popular Music Studies,

no. 16-1, edited by Clément Canonne and Baptiste Bacot

– 198 p. — 19 €

– Table of contents: https://www.cairn.info/revue-volume-2019-2.htm

– Order the issue: https://www.lespressesdureel.com/ouvrage.php?id=7682

– Subscribe: http://www.seteun.net/spip.php?rubrique4


This issue examines some of the practices in which music and hacking meet. At first closely related to the development of American computer science research laboratories, hacking has since spread across various fields of human activity not necessarily related to information and communications technology. Hence, music provides both a theoretical and empirical space within which one can question hacking’s attributes, and delineate their aesthetic and organolologic effects, but also their integration into musicians’ discourses, or the way these musicans create musical communities and belong to them.


The interview with hacking pioneer Nicolas Collins is available in English on the site Books & Ideashttps://booksandideas.net/Hacking-Through-Contemporary-Electronic-Music.html

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Media and the Night: An International Conference

April 29 and 30, 2020

McGill University, Montreal

Organized by

Jhessica Reia, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Art History and Communication Studies, McGill University

Will Straw, James McGill Professor of Urban Media Studies, Department of Art History and Communication Studies, McGill University

Over the last decade, the study of the night has emerged as an international, interdisciplinary field of scholarly research. Historians, archaeologists, geographers, urbanists, economists and scholars of culture and literature have analyzed the night time of communities large and small, across a wide range of historical periods. The study of the night has expanded in tandem with new attention to the night on the part of city administrations, organizers of cultural events (like nuits blanches and museum nights) and activists fighting gentrification, systems of control and practices of harassment and exclusion which limit the “right to the night” of various populations. 

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IASPM Journal Vol 9, No 1: Pop Music Festivals and (Cultural) Policies

Dear IASPM members, 

I am happy to announce the publication of the new IASPM Journal special issue on „Pop Music Festivals and (Cultural) Policies“, guest edited by Beate Flath, Adam Behr and Martin Cloonan.  

You can find it here: https://iaspmjournal.net/index.php/IASPM_Journal/issue/view/67

Many thanks to the authors, the reviewers and the editorial team!

On behalf of the special issue editors 

Beate Flath 

cfp: Progressive Rock and Metal

Deadline 15 September 2019

Progressive Rock and Metal: Towards a Contemporary Understanding 
The 4th Biennial International Conference of the Progect Network for the Study of Progressive Rock

Hosted by Lori Burns at the University of Ottawa, May 20-22, 2020 (Ottawa, Canada)

Progressive Rock and Metal: Towards a Contemporary Understanding aims to explore the past and present contexts of the genres of progressive rock and metal. The Progect Network has met in France (2014), in Scotland (2016), and in Sweden (2018). The 2020 meeting will mark the first North American hosting of this conference and will thus expand participation and open the scholarly dialogue in exciting ways. This conference will bring together scholars who have addressed the musical structures and expression of 1970s progressive rock, as well as scholars working on the more contemporary manifestations of the progressive. We encourage submissions from scholars from a range of disciplinary orientations.

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Songwriting Studies Journal

We are pleased to announce the launch of the Songwriting Studies Journal, an initiative that emerges from the AHRC-funded Songwriting Studies Research Network based at Birmingham City University and the University of Liverpool. Since launching our series of national research events we’ve become increasingly aware of the diversity of scholarly work that intersects with songwriting. The network now seeks contributions from scholars for an inaugural issue of the journal that will help define the emerging interdisciplinary field of songwriting studies.

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