Applications for IASPM 2021

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According to IASPM Statutes, IASPM EC has to make the proposals for next biennial IASPM conference public for the members one month before the GM. This was done accordingly.

The IASPM EC received two proposals for the location of the XXI biennial IASPM conference. The proposals have now been taken down, by the request of Daegu (South Korea) officials, who were voted to be the hosts for IASPM 2021. Congrats to them, and big thanks for Oslo, for their bid.

cfp: Transformational POP. 4th IASPM D-A-CH Conference, 22-24 October, Paderborn

call for papers

Transformational POP

Transitions, Breaks, and Crises in Popular Music (Studies)

4th Biennial IASPM D-A-CH Conference, 22–24 October 2020

Paderborn University/Germany, Faculty of Humanities and Arts, Department of Music – Popular Music and Media

Organizational Committee: IASPM D-A-CH Executive Committee and Advisory Board +  Jun.-Prof. Dr. Beate Flath, Prof. Dr. Christoph Jacke, Manuel Troike (Local hosts)

Pop music cultures, in their entire breadth, are seismographs of social, political, economic, ecological, media, artistic, and technological transformations. In and through them, fields of tensions, disruptions, and lines of conflict become not only visible, audible and perceptible, but also communicable and thus, negotiable. Economic and ecological crises, social structural changes, political shifts, communicative-media discourses, atmospheric moods, and disturbances of the most diverse kind cannot be appreciated in isolation from specific sounds, performances, lyrics, images, stars, genres, etc. Therefore, these are always changing in the process: pop music cultures transform and are themselves transformed. “Pop is transformational, always. It is a dynamic movement in which cultural materials and its social environments mutually reshape each other, crossing previously fixed boundaries: class boundaries, ethnic boundaries or cultural boundaries [own translation].“ (Diedrich Diederichsen, Pop – deskriptiv, normativ, emphatisch (1996). In: Charis Goer, Stefan Greif, Christoph Jacke (Eds.): Texte zur Theorie des Pop, 2013: 188)

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Full Music PhD Scholarship Dublin City University

PhD Music Scholarship at Dublin City University. The Scholarship comprises a stipend of €16,000 per annum and full fees for 4 years

Proposals that address topics in popular music, music ethnography or music and the moving image would be welcome in addition to other areas of musicology, applied musicology and composition. The closing date is Friday 3 April 2020. Further information and details on the application process can be viewed here.  The scholarship is open to EU, UK and international applications.           

REGISTRATION Media Industries 2020: Global Currents and Contradictions, 16-18 April 2020 King’s College London

Media Industries 2020: Global Currents and Contradictions

16-18 April 2020

King’s College London

Registration is now open to NON-SPEAKERS.

Visit https://media-industries.org/ for details of the conference, delegate fees, venue, travel, accommodation and accessibility.

Important: Tickets are limited and will be available until all are sold or until 18.00hrs GMT on Friday 13 March, whichever is soonest.

Delegate Rates

For full registration details, visit https://media-industries.org/registration

Rates are divided between Full (academics, waged) and Reduced (students, unwaged), and  graduated according to the three tiers of the World Bank’s classification of countries by per capita income levels. As a delegate, you pay the rate according to the country you live in and not the country from which you originate. Delegates who are residents of countries in tier B pay 75% of the tier A price, and residents of tier C countries pay 50% of the tier A price.

cfp: [IASPM Journal] Open Call for Papers

CALL FOR PAPERS

IASPM Journal is the Open-Access journal of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (IASPM), an organization established to promote inquiry, scholarship and analysis in the area of popular music. We publish articles and book reviews that consider popular music of any genre, historical period or geographic location. In addition to Special Issue CFPs, the journal maintains a space for ongoing scholarly work. We are now accepting article submissions, with the deadline by April 1st, 2020.


As part of an international network, the journal aims to disseminate IASPM members’ research that is local, transnational, global and/or international. English is the official language, but articles may also be submitted in the official language of any of its branches (adding an English abstract). Studies may use a range of research methodologies and critical approaches, including practice as research. Our Open-Access readership is diverse and interdisciplinary and so we ask contributors to present ideas in forms accessible to sociologists, musicologists, music critics and practitioners.

In order to submit to IASPM Journal you must be an IASPM member and registered as an author on the site. See the journal site for further information regarding Submissions. Click here for a copy of the Open CFP (in several languages) and Style Guide. All articles undergo a double-blind peer review.

We look forward to receiving your submissions. 

Kind regards,

Xavier Villanueva

Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Assistant Editor IASPM Journal

1st Queer Forum of the LGBTQ+ Music Study Group

https://www.lgbtqmusicstudygroup.com/

Friday 3rd April 2020, University of York

Invitation to Participate

The LGBTQ+ Music Study Group hereby launches a new biennial initiative: “Queer Forum”. This day-long event aims to catalyse new ways of thinking, being and doing music scholarship in and beyond the academy. As José Esteban Muñoz writes, “[w]e may never touch queerness, but we can feel it as the warm illumination of a horizon imbued with potentiality” (2009, 1). Inspired by queer and feminist theorists – especially bell hooks and Sara Ahmed – who are dissatisfied with the present, who wrestle with existing institutional structures, and who propose new modes of scholarship and education, we entice you to join us in radical academic experimentation in search for new horizons and potentialities.

The 2020 forum urges participants to recover queer pasts and imagine new queer futures. How do we create opportunity, time and space in the academy beyond the logics of capitalism to allow us to muse about music? What are the possibilities for forging strong/vulnerable subjectivities and caring solidarities within and beyond existing academic hierarchies? What freedoms can we gift ourselves to allow for experimentation in our musical writing, teaching and performing? How do we nurture and share intersectional wisdoms in ways that centre the health, well-being and vitality of ourselves and others?

The day will include no formal presentations; rather, it will be structured around a range of different creative, intellectual and social activities – workshops, reading groups, group work, interventions – that tempt us to try out new conceptualisations and embodiments of queer music scholarship. The day will begin at 9am and end at 5pm. Participants are welcome to join us for a dinner the evening before (Thursday 2nd April, 7pm).

We welcome musicians and scholars within music studies (including ethnomusicology, historical musicology, performance studies, popular music studies, theory and analysis, etc.) and beyond. The event is free to attend and we will offer refreshments during the day. Dinner and accommodation will be at participants’ own expenses. Information about accommodation will be sent out following event registration. Please register your participation on Eventbrite by 1st March 2020https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/1st-queer-forum-of-the-lgbtq-music-study-group-tickets-92339677461

The event is organised by Marie Bennett, Rachel Cowgill, Thomas Hilder and Danielle Sofer. We are grateful to the University of York and the RMA for supporting this event. For any queries, please email: lgbtqmusicsg@gmail.com

cfp: Transcultural Hip-Hop

CALL FOR PAPERS

Transcultural Hip-Hop: Constructing and Contesting Identity, Space, and Place in the Americas and beyond

University of Bern, Switzerland, October 30 – 31, 2020

Almost fifty years after its birth, hip-hop is considered a truly global phenomenon that combines elements of uniformity with local symbols and expressions regarding musical forms, lyrics, performances, and social content. It can be said that within the US context, hip-hop emerged during the 1970s as an African American subculture. However, from its very beginning hip-hop has been a highly transcultural and hybrid phenomenon that integrates various musical elements and forms of cultural expression. In addition to African American popular culture, for example, Caribbean and Latin American music styles, language and dance played a vital role in the formation and development of hip-hop on both coasts of the US. The entanglement of diverse cultures and diasporas on the evolution of hip-hop as a music and as a movement, in the urban settings of New York and Los Angeles, for example, encourages us to think of these different musical, cultural, and social traits in more fluid or hybrid terms. 

Furthermore, diasporic identity in the multicultural neighborhoods where hip-hop first emerged is also fluid concerning the interaction between diasporic “peripheries” and their centers of origin. This conference aims to focus on the transcultural, inter-ethnic and diasporic exchanges that created hip-hop and helped to spread it within the US and beyond. The conference asks how identity markers bound by ethnic, cultural, and spatial categories are being negotiated in hip-hop. While concentrating on the Americas, the conference will also include papers that focus on other world regions and on transregional entanglements.

Within the framework of transculturality, the organizers wish to focus on three principal areas of enquiry:

A. Identity Politics in Hip-Hop

In the context of US hip-hop, many scholars argue that hip-hop should be understood with regard to its African American “centrality” (Ogbar 2007; Perry 2004). While this is not disputed by the conference organizers per se, we ask how can we better understand the hybridity of hip-hop music and culture, both at its point of origin, and as a global phenomenon? Furthermore, how do other minority groups and diasporas draw upon ´African American´ cultural markers to legitimate their contributions to the genre? How do local and global hip-hop movements reproduce and adapt such identity markers to different social and political contexts and agendas? In doing so, notions of identity and authenticity are contested and broadened over time.

B. Movement, Reproduction and Hybridity of Cultural Signifiers in Hip-Hop

Following on from these themes and borrowing from Appadurai’s (1996) understanding of cultural flows or ‘scapes’ in an era of globalization, one way of understanding the myriad creations of hybrid identity constructions in hip-hop is to identify and unpack the reproduction and merging of cultural signifiers, be they musical, visual, linguistic or otherwise. Which cultural symbols are (re-)produced in a particular context, and how do local or national cultural forms interact with transnational and global cultural flows? How does cultural politics shape the negotiation of cultural signifiers? Finally, for minority groups establishing themselves in different diasporic contexts, what is their relationship with their home or national culture from afar, and how do they shape the transcultural dynamics of centers of hip-hop production?

C. Space & Place in Hip-Hop

Like no other musical genre, hip-hop reflects a unique importance of space and identity(Rose 1994; Forman 2002). From its very inception in New York City, representing one’s neighborhood at battles was a central part of hip-hop culture. When Los Angeles became the center of gangster rap in the late 1980s, African American and Latino rap artists highlighted the intermingling of hip-hop with gang culture on the West Coast. The East Coast/West Coast feud in the mid-1990s, culminating in the deaths of Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls, pointed to the collision of geographical and musical spaces when negotiating spatial identities and affiliations. Thus, in its myriad forms and expressions in the US and around the globe, hip-hop’s “powerful ties to place” (Forman 2002) are omnipresent and reflected by artist names, languages and local slang as well as references to specific geographical markers and signature musical styles of a particular locality. How are common issues of marginalization and contested localities being negotiated in hiphop? What can these place-identities tell us about the political, socio-geographic and cultural context hip-hop culture is produced in?

The conference will be held in English and prospective participants should please send a title and abstract of up to 300 words to keith.cann@hist.unibe.ch by March 15, 2020.

Travel and accommodation costs will be covered thanks to funding from the Swiss National Science Foundation.

Volume 22 of Ethnomusicology Review

Volume 22 of Ethnomusicology Reviewhttps://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/journal/volume/22-0

Introduction

by the editors Samuel Lamontagne and Tyler Yamin

Invited Article:

-The Anthropocene and Music Studies

  by Jim Sykes

Peer-reviewed Articles:

-The (Musical) Performance at Stake: An Ethnomusicological Review

  by Anthony Gregoire

-The Role of Tone-colour in Japanese Shakuhachi Music

  by Nick Bellando and Bruno Deschenes

-The Forging of Musical Festivity in Baloch Muscat: From Arabian Sea Empire      to Gulf Transurbanism to the Pan-Tropical Imaginary

  by George Murer

We’d also like to remind you that the deadline for our Volume 23 is March 23.

For more information: https://ethnomusicologyreview.ucla.edu/content/call-papers-ethnomusicology-review-volume-23

Transmedia Directors

Carol Vernallis, Holly Rogers and Lisa Perrott are happy to announce the second book in their Bloomsbury book series, New Approaches to Music, Sound and Media (https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/series/new-approaches-to-sound-music-and-media/)

Transmedia Directors: Artistry, Industry and New Audiovisual Aesthetics, edited by Carol, Holly and Lisa, focuses on artist-practitioners who work across media, platforms and disciplines, including film, television, music video, commercials and the internet. Working in the age of media convergence, today’s em/impresarios project a distinctive style that points toward a new contemporary aesthetics. The media they engage with enrich their practices – through film and television (with its potential for world-building and sense of the past and future), music video (with its audiovisual aesthetics and rhythm), commercials (with their ability to project a message quickly) and the internet (with its refreshed concepts of audience and participation), to larger forms like restaurants and amusement parks (with their materiality alongside today’s digital aesthetics). These directors encourage us to reassess concepts of authorship, assemblage, transmedia, audiovisual aesthetics and world-building.

Providing a vital resource for scholars and practitioners, this collection weaves together insights about artist-practitioners’ collaborative processes as well as strategies for composition, representation, subversion and resistance. Directors and practitioners discussed include David Lynch, Barry Jenkins, Wes Anderson, Sofia Coppola, Michael Bay, David Fincher, Bong Joon-ho and Lars von Trier; musicians and music-video/film directors David Bowie, Floria Sigismondi, Jess Cope, Dave Meyers, Emil Nava and Sigur Rós; and Instagram and new media personality Jay Versace.

Other titles in the series:

Áine Mangaoang, Dangerous Mediations: Pop Music in a Philippine Prison Video

Forthcoming titles include:

Nicola Dibben, Biophilia

Cat Hope and Ryan Ross Smith, Animated Music Notation

Alex Jeffrey, Popular Music and Narrativity

Lutz Koepnick, Resonant Matter

Lisa Perrott, David Bowie in Music Video

Nick Prior, Assembling Virtual Idols

Carol Vernallis, Selmin Kara and Holly Rogers, CyberMedia

Nabeel Zuberi, Popular Music, Race and Media since 9/11

If you would like to submit a proposal to the series, please email us:

Cvernall@stanford.edu

h.rogers@gold.ac.uk

lisa.perrott@waikato.ac.nz

Popular Music History news

We’re pleased to announce two new issues of Popular Music History:

11(3) General Issue

This issue has two articles on Rush, particularly apt given the recent death of Neil Peart. Just as importantly, tribute is paid to Dave Laing, and we thank Adam Behr and Martin Cloonan for their permission to reprint earlier takes on Dave’s career, and his qualities as a valued research comrade.

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cfp: KISMIF Conference in Porto 2020 + Summer School 2020

We are organizing the fifth KISMIF Conference, happening in Porto, 8-11 July 2020. The conference will take place in The Faculty of Arts and Humanities of the University of Porto, Casa da Música and Rivoli Municipal Theatre of Porto, among others, for four days of multidisciplinary presentations and discussions about “DIY Cultures and Global Challenges”.

On July 7th Rivoli Municipal Theatre of Porto will also host the Summer School ‘Not Just Holidays in the Sun’ which will offer an opportunity for all interested persons, including those participating in the Conference, to attend workshops directed by specialists in their fields.

Please take some time to read and share the call for papers. You can also read them online and share the links.

Conference call for papers: https://www.kismifconference.com/call-conference/

Summer School call for papers: https://www.kismifconference.com/call-summer-school/

All the information here: https://www.kismifconference.com/