The eXtensible Electric Guitar Festival

the eXtensible Electric Guitar Festival

Since its development in the mid-twentieth century, the electric guitar has had a profound influence on many aspects of music, creating new sounds, spurring the development of new musical styles, and reshaping concepts of musicianship. In the early twenty first century, despite retaining its iconic status as a symbol of innovation and transgression, the electric guitar and its uses now seem commonplace, almost routine; in short, the instrument may be in danger of losing its edge.

The Extensible Electric Guitar Festival aims to rediscover and showcase the electric guitar’s spirit of innovation and exploration. To that end we are looking for music and musicians that use the electric guitar in innovative ways and which extend its capabilities. Music which uses the electric guitar as a controller, with electronics and computers, and with multi-media are encouraged. We anticipate having two evening concerts, one in a concert hall setting, another in a club setting. There

Music: The Extensible Electric Guitar Festival
Clark University, Worcester MA USA
April 4-5, 2008Call for Music and PerformersDeadline: 01/01/08Project directors:
David Claman
Matt Malsky (Clark University)

Symposium: The Extensible Electric Guitar Festival
Clark University, Worcester MA USA
April 4-5, 2008Call for Presentations
Symposium: ‘Instruments of the Post-Prohibitive Age’Deadline: 01/01/08Our symposium begins where Kyle Gann’s keynote to the Extensible Toy Piano Festival (Nov. 2005) left us — with a consideration of the ‘post-prohibitive era’.** Listeners have access to music from every historical era, social context and geographic location, and it’s all accessible instantaneously. Musicians can synthesize all previous musical thought. Every musical style, unusual sound, revolutionary impulse or aesthetic ideal can be incorporated into new music. If modernism’s relationship with mass-culture was marked by a fear of contagion, our post-prohibitive era might be thought of in terms of information-overload. And how do we go about making sense of it all?

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